Raw: Using OpenSSL to create a certificate authority and update IIS 7.5

  • December 29, 2010
  • James Skemp
A raw dump of information on how to create a certificate authority and etcetera. Step 1: Basic folder and file structure creation Directories: certs, keys, requests Files: database.txt (empty), serial.txt (01, then new line), openssl.cnf (based on OpenSSL file) Step 2: Create key "c:\Program Files (x86)\Apache Software Foundation\Apache2.2\bin\openssl.exe" genrsa -des3 -out keys/_ca.key 2048 Step 3: Create certificate authority certificate "c:\Program Files (x86)\Apache Software Foundation\Apache2.2\bin\openssl.exe" req -config openssl.cnf -new -x509 -days 365 -key keys/_ca.

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Getting started with StatSVN (0.7.0) and CollabNet Subversion Server

  • October 31, 2010
  • James Skemp
This past week I was looking at advanced statistical information about a couple Subversion repositories we use at work. While TortoiseSVN has some basic reporting, the downside is that, out of the box, users must have access to the repository to access this information. StatSVN, seemingly the most popular solution, works rather well as an alternative to granting this access. The downside (or upside, depending upon your perspective) is that viewers of the report can see what files changed, and how many lines, but not what the actual changes were (outside of the logged message).

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Upgrading Subversion 1.5.x to 1.6.0 on Windows Vista - checklist

  • March 23, 2009
  • James Skemp
The following is how I went about performing an upgrade of Subversion 1.5.4 to Subversion 1.6.0. For this I'll be continuing to use the current Windows build of Apache 2.2.x, TortoiseSVN, and of course Subversion. At this time, that's Subversion 1.6.0, TortoiseSVN 1.6.0, and Apache 2.2.11. Determine current setup. Opening the Apache Service Monitor will show the version of Apache and Subversion. In my case, that's 2.

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Subversion 1.5.3 and TortoiseSVN 1.5.4 released

  • October 12, 2008
  • James Skemp
The newest versions of Subversion and TortoiseSVN were released just last week. My install guides for Subversion on Vista (and another with Subversion on Vista with Apache 2.2.x) and TortoiseSVN on Vista are still applicable. If installing Subversion with Apache 2.2.x, make sure you stop Apache before replacing files.

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Installing Subversion binaries for Apache 2.2.x

  • August 19, 2008
  • James Skemp
Recently I went ahead and installed Apache 2.2.9 to my Windows Vista Ultimate machine. The purpose of doing that was to move towards a Subversion install running on Apache. In this article, I'll be covering that installation. Getting Subversion Obviously, the first thing to do is to get Subversion. We're looking for the Windows Apache 2.2.x binaries, in particular. At the time of this writing, that's svn-win32-1.5.1.zip. In a previous guide, which you may have followed, I installed the Windows installer with the basic win32 binaries.

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Install Apache 2.2.9 to Windows Vista (Ultimate)

  • August 15, 2008
  • James Skemp
In this article I'll be covering an installation of Apache 2.2.9 to Windows Vista Ultimate. I'll be installing Apache so that you can run IIS as well (hence, Apache will be on a different port). You may want to do this if you want to run Subversion on Apache (as I do). Installing Apache 2.2 Currently the Apache HTTP Server has both a 2.0 and 2.2 version. For new development, the 2.

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Errata: Apache JMeter

  • July 24, 2008
  • James Skemp
The following is errata for Apache JMeter, by Emily H. Halili, and has been submitted to Packt Publishing. Read my review.  Page 4, 2nd to last sentence: 'downlad' should be 'download' Page 13, last sentence: "You too can contribute." Page 39, 1st paragraph, last sentence: "as a failed request." Page 42, 1st paragraph, last sentence: "retrieve a particular value" Page 48, last list item: display shows "KB/sec" but the list item is "Kb/sec" Page 48: Is the mean time in ms?

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Configuring Apache for per-user pages

  • June 18, 2007
  • James Skemp
First, open the Apache configuration file. sudo nano /usr/local/apache2/conf/httpd.conf Now find the following line, and remove the pound sign from the beginning of the line. #Include conf/extra/httpd-userdir.conf Ctrl + X to save and exit. If you want, you can open this file by running the following. sudo nano /usr/local/apache2/conf/extra/httpd-userdir.conf But, there's no real reason to do this. So, changes made, restart Apache.

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Quickie: Install ColdFusion 7.02 on Ubuntu 7.04 with Apache 2.2.4

  • June 15, 2007
  • James Skemp
Ubuntu 6.10(Edgy Eft) Apache2, PHP5, MySQL & Coldfusion Install Howto provided some inspiration, with changes made as necessary (per my Apache 2.2.4 installation). Downloaded 7.02 Developer Edition from Adobe (coldfusion-702-lin.bin) to src directory. cp coldfusion-702-lin.bin coldfusion.bak cat coldfusion.bak | sed "s/export LD_ASSUME_KERNEL/#xport LD_ASSUME_KERNEL/" > coldfusion-702-lin.bin sudo sh coldfusion-702-lin.bin Server Configuration. Choose a server configuration. Choose Apache. httpd.conf directory = /usr/local/apache2/conf Program binary = /usr/local/apache2/bin/httpd (default) Control file = /usr/local/apache2/bin/apachectl (default)

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Quickie: Install Apache 2.2.4 on Ubuntu

  • June 15, 2007
  • James Skemp
May not be the best, but ... here's how I installed Apache 2.2.4 on Ubuntu (7.04), based on David Winter's guide Building Apache 2.2 from source for Ubuntu Dapper. All code from a terminal, unless otherwise noted. sudo apt-get install build-essential cd mkdir src cd src I downloaded zlib from http://www.zlib.net/ (zlib source code, version 1.2.3, tar.gz format) into the src folder, and extracted it to the same.

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Installing Apache 2.2.4 to a Windows-based computer, locally: Part 1

  • March 17, 2007
  • James Skemp

In February 2006, I wrote an article covering the installation of Apache 1.3.34, which can be found on my site, StrivingLife.net. In August 2006, I covered the installation of Apache 2.0.59. This time, I'll be covering the installation of the current version of Apache 2.2.x, Apache 2.2.4, to a Windows XP machine, for the purpose of local development.

While I'll be covering an installation of Apache 2.2.4 that will work along with Apache 1.3.x and Apache 2.0.x, this guide will work equally well if you're installing Apache 2.2.x by itself.

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Upgrading PHP (4.4.2 to 4.4.4 and 5.1.4 to 5.2.0)

  • November 26, 2006
  • James Skemp

In this article, we'll be upgrading PHP on our local, Windows, Web server. In previous guides we installed PHP 4.4.2 as well as PHP 5.1.4, both on the same machine, with the ability to switch as we like. However, we've yet to cover how to upgrade either installation (and upgrading is definitely a need).

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Is it past time for Microsoft to open IIS?

  • September 23, 2006
  • James Skemp
There's a reason PHP and Apache are so popular on the Web. It's the same reason that most beginner's, especially those that have no formal training, start with these technologies. In a word, both technologies are not only open source, but free to use. With the right guide, a user can be up and running with Apache and PHP in a couple of hours. Unfortunately, Microsoft's IIS (Internet Information Services) is something that few home-grown Web users have the honour of using.

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Installing Apache 2.0.59 to a Windows-based computer, locally: Part 4

  • August 28, 2006
  • James Skemp
In the previous three parts of this guide, we setup Apache 2.0.59 and then created the necessary connections to use ActivePerl, mod_perl, ColdFusion MX 6.1, ColdFusion MX 7.0.2, PHP 4.4.2, PHP 5.1.4, MySQL 4.1.18, and PostgreSQL 8.1.3. This time, we're going to bring everything together by creating a number of batch files to fairly easily switch between various Web server setups. What is a batch file? A batch file is basically a way to run a number of Windows prompts at once.

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Installing Apache 2.0.59 to a Windows-based computer, locally: Part 3

  • August 26, 2006
  • James Skemp
In Part 1 of this Apache 2.0.59 guide, we setup Apache 2.0.59 on a Windows XP SP2 machine. We also setup Perl and mod_perl, attempting to mimic our Apache 1.3.34 install. In Part 2 of this Apache 2.0.59 guide, we setup ColdFusion MX 6.1 and 7.0. This time, we'll be continuing in our quest by adding support for both PHP 4 and PHP 5. In previous guides, we installed PHP 4 and PHP 5, so if you need to install either one, do so with the above directions.

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Installing Apache 2.0.59 to a Windows-based computer, locally: Part 2

  • August 25, 2006
  • James Skemp

In Part 1 of this Apache 2.0.59 guide, we setup Apache 2.0.59 on a Windows XP SP2 machine. We also setup Perl and mod_perl, attempting to mimic our Apache 1.3.34 install. This time, we'll be continuing in our quest by installing ColdFusion MX 6.1 and 7.

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Installing Apache 2.0.59 to a Windows-based computer, locally: Part 1

  • August 22, 2006
  • James Skemp
In a previous article, I described how to install Apache 1.3.34 to an average home computer, running Windows XP. Since then, only Apache 1.3.35 has been released that would allow me to update my guide, even though the current 1.3.x version is 1.3.37. There's also a desire on my part to use Apache 2.0, even though my host has not yet begun using them. For that reason, I'll be walking through a second installation of Apache on a home computer, so that both Apache 1.

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Dual-installing PHP: Running PHP 5 and 4 on the same local, Windows-based, Apache, server

  • July 18, 2006
  • James Skemp
In previous guides, we installed PHP 4.4.2 and later moved our installation to a different folder. This time, we'll be installing the current release of PHP 5 (5.1.4) so that we can still switch back to PHP 4.4.2 if we'd like. Downloading PHP 5.x The current version of PHP 5.x is 5.1.4, so we'll begin by downloading that from PHP.net. We’ll want to download the (Windows Binaries) zip file, even though it is significantly larger in size than the installer (the zip file is almost 9 MB, compared to less than 3 MB for the executable), but allows us a deal more flexibility.

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Moving the location of PHP on your hard drive

  • July 1, 2006
  • James Skemp
In this article, we'll be moving our installation of PHP 4.4.2 from c:\php\ to c:\php4\. We'll be doing this primarily because we may like the ability to run multiple versions of PHP at one time, on our development server. This will pave the way for our future installation of PHP 5.1.4 (or the current version of PHP 5.x). The added benefit is that we'll have an idea of just how many documents are involved in a relatively simple change.

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Upgrading phpMyAdmin (2.7.0-pl2 to 2.8.1) on a local, Windows-based, Apache server

  • June 20, 2006
  • James Skemp

In a previous post, we installed phpMyAdmin 2.7.0-pl2 to our local Web server. We did this so that we would have an easy way to administer our MySQL databases, from a PHP-based interface. This time, we'll be upgrading phpMyAdmin to version 2.8.1.

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Upgrading to Zend Optimizer 3.0.1 on a local Windows-based, Apache, server

  • June 8, 2006
  • James Skemp
In a previous guide, we installed Zend Optimizer 2.6.2 to a local Windows-based Apache 1.x server, running PHP 4.4.2. This time, we'll be upgrading Zend Optimizer from 2.6.2 to 3.0.1. Downloading and backups First, we'll need to download a copy from http://www.zend.com/products/zend_optimizer/. We've already setup an account when we downloaded 2.6.2, so we can simply log in. Of course, if you've forgotten your password you can request assistance, and if you haven't downloaded Zend Optimizer before, you can setup an account.

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Installing mod_perl on a local Windows-based, Apache server

  • April 8, 2006
  • James Skemp

The home page of mod_perl gives a great explanation of what mod_perl is, and what it provides. We'll be installing mod_perl simply because it will help us install other functionality as time goes by.

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Installing ColdFusion MX 7.0.1 on a local Windows-based, Apache, server

  • March 31, 2006
  • James Skemp
Note: For information on updating to ColdFusion MX 7.0.2, see Upgrading our installation of ColdFusion MX 7.0.1 on a local Windows-based, Apache, server. Update: October 10, 2006 @ 7:11 pm - Thanks to Michael Bryce for his helpful comments regarding this documentation. In this article, we'll be walking through an installation of ColdFusion MX 7.0.1, Developer's Edition. Since we've already covered the installation of ColdFusion MX 6.

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Error handling on a local Windows-based, Apache, server

  • March 16, 2006
  • James Skemp

This time, we'll be setting up very basic error handling, and setup our first .htaccess file.

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Installing PostgreSQL on a local Windows-based, Apache, server

  • March 15, 2006
  • James Skemp
While we've already setup MySQL, another popular SQL server is PostgreSQL. Like MySQL, PostgreSQL is absolutely free, and will allow us to create databases on our local server. Downloading PostgreSQL We'll be downloading the most current version of PostgreSQL, which is 8.1.3 at the time of this writing. You can download the installation file from http://www.postgresql.org/ftp/win32. We'll want to download the regular zip file, called postgresql-8.1.3-1.zip, and weighing in at 21 MB.

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Setting up WordPress on a local Web server

  • February 28, 2006
  • James Skemp

Note: This guide should work equally well for WordPress 2.0.2 and above. For a guide on upgrading this 2.0.1 install, see Upgrading (our local install of) WordPress.

In our previous tutorials, we setup an Apache-based Web server, on a Windows XP home computer. The Web server is also running PHP and MySQL, as well as ColdFusion MX. This time, we'll be installing WordPress onto our local Web server. This installation will require us to work with both PHP and MySQL, and we'll be able to setup any number of WordPresses after we have completed this one.

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Installing ColdFusion on a local Windows-based, Apache, server

  • February 27, 2006
  • James Skemp

Note: For information on installing, or upgrading to ColdFusion MX 7.0.1, see Installing ColdFusion MX 7.0.1 on a local Windows-based, Apache, server.

In this tutorial, we'll be working through an installation of ColdFusion MX 6.1, Developer's Edition, on a local, Windows-based, Apache server. On this server, we've setup Apache, PHP, and MySQL, but will also want to have the ability to work with ColdFusion code (however, not necessarily on the same sites that we'll be using PHP). We'll be doing this to experience a more corporate Web-programming language – corporate primarily because of the costs associated with ColdFusion.

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A local, Apache Web server, on a Windows XP computer

  • February 27, 2006
  • James Skemp
My intention is to write a number of guides that will help someone build a functional Web server for testing purposes. Since Windows is fairly popular, I've decided to outline how to install Web server programs on it. Since Apache is both powerful and free, I've opted to use it as the core, instead of IIS, or the like. I also plan on keeping the various technologies up-to-date, yet continuing to provide the instructions for past versions used, just in case.

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Installing PHP on a local Windows-based, Apache, server

  • February 22, 2006
  • James Skemp
While our previous article walked through adding Perl to our local server, Perl just isn't going to cut it for creating dynamic content. For that, we're going to have to install a more powerful language. As I said quite a few articles ago, if we would have gone the IIS route, we could have the use of ASP. However, since we're going the Apache route, that means PHP is our best choice.

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Installing Perl on a local Windows-based, Apache, server

  • February 21, 2006
  • James Skemp

Note: This guide should work equally well for ActivePerl 5.8.8.817 and above. For a guide on upgrading this 5.8.7.815 install, see Upgrading (our local install of) ActivePerl.

Now that we've installed Apache, configured our log files, and setup a log file analysis tool, it's time to install Perl. Perl will allow us to expand our horizons, and specifically will help us install a better log analyzer.

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Log file analysis of our Windows-based, Apache, Web sites

  • February 20, 2006
  • James Skemp
In our previous articles, we walked through installing Apache to a Windows XP home computer.  This time, we'll be setting up our log files for analysis, and installing a way to view the log file information. Log files are created by Web sites to track page views and visitors.  For example, if we go to a page on one of our local Web sites with Firefox, like http://website.localhost/, it adds the following lines to a file called access.

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Creating additional testing sites in Apache, on a local Windows computer

  • February 18, 2006
  • James Skemp
That is, Google has a number of different subdomains. News.google.com, mail.google.com, and regular old www.google.com. With an Apache and Windows change, we can replicate this as well. First, let's open up our Apache configuration file. If you followed the steps in the Installing Apache to a Windows-based computer, locally guide, you can find this file at C:\Program Files\Apache Group\Apache\conf\httpd.conf, or via the Start menu (detailed in the previous article).

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Installing Apache to a Windows-based computer, locally

  • February 16, 2006
  • James Skemp
I use Firefox, and have goofed around with Linux (installation and usage), but I nonetheless recommend Windows XP. With technology as it is, you can purchase a fairly good computer for under $500. I also recommend at least 512MB of memory, and a processor speed of 1GHz or more. Again, today's computers easily meet or surpass these numbers. Why would I want to install Apache to my machine? There's a number of very good reasons to install Apache locally.

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