HTML5 / LocalStorage Web application manager tool

  • April 2, 2011
  • James Skemp
As previously mentioned I've been spending a good amount of time looking at HTML5/local storage in my free time. For testing purposes, I ended up putting a number of items within my video games offline application, which is fine, but results in some extraneous information on the page. To clean this up, as well as to allow for additional functionality, I've gone ahead and created a Web application manager for my media.

Read More

Interesting feature with parsing XML with jQuery on Safari

  • March 27, 2011
  • James Skemp
I've been playing around with HTML5 quite a bit recently, in particular with offline Web applications. My second experiment (my first is on pause) was with making my video games available, so that I can access the listing when I'm out shopping at used game stores. It's still in progress, but you can see my offline listing of video games now. My main intention is to make this available on my iPod Touch, so I was a bit dismayed when I found that the listing didn't display the title of the game.

Read More

Supporting HTML5 manifest files on IIS 7 using Web.config

  • February 18, 2011
  • James Skemp
Having recently picked up an iPod Touch, to replace my Classic, I've become very interested in HTML5's ability to navigate content offline. In my environment I decided to create a separate directory for my manifest files. I'm also running IIS 7, on Server 2008 R2, so .manifest files are already defined for WPF. So that that isn't an issue, I created a Web.config file in the manifest directory with the below contents.

Read More

The Kinect is selling really well; but is that good for gamers?

  • November 29, 2010
  • James Skemp
Techmeme had a couple of interesting titles this evening. "Kinect is Selling 2X as Fast as the iPad" and "Microsoft: Over 2.5M Kinect Sold." Even if I thought I had the space for it (I'd have to move furniture every time I wanted to play it in my current apartment) I still wouldn't pick up the Kinect. Why? First there's the price. At $150 you might as well buy a PSP (which I did) or a Nintendo DSi.

Read More

23+ hours with the PlayStation Portable: Initial thoughts

  • November 15, 2010
  • James Skemp
On the first of the month I purchased a Sony PlayStation Portable, which was delivered to me on the 4th. Since then I've used it, mostly for play, for approximately 24 hours. Approximately 23 hours and 12 minutes of that was with my first game, Crisis Core; Final Fantasy VII, and the rest (which was probably over an hour) was initial setups, as well as the playing of a handful of demos, and Castlevania: Symphony of the Night, which I had purchased for play on my PS3 a long while ago.

Read More

Sin City / color in movies

  • October 23, 2010
  • James Skemp
A thread from Facebook that I don't want to lose. To be updated as more responses come in. Initial post Ah, color in movies. Like the bar scene - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sbl2LxNZ2eY - in Sin City and near the end of Avalon - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P28-PPzCI3k - and the obvious ones in the Wizard of Oz. Any other good examples? Response from Rob Lumley You seem to be mentioning when a particular color stands out.

Read More

Extended iTunes Track class for PHP

  • September 26, 2010
  • James Skemp
In a previous article, I had outlined classes in C# and PHP to handle iTunes Playlists to Xml outputs. Having let it sit on the back burner for long enough, I finally went back to the PHP class and finalized the constructor. I also added two functions for sorting. Below I have the current code for the class (a current version of the Track class for PHP will always be available elsewhere) and then an example implementation.

Read More

iTunes Track class in C# and PHP

  • September 8, 2010
  • James Skemp
I've recently begun reading up on PHP again. As I'm most fond of my iTunes Playlists to Xml application, I thought I'd work with that application's output - XML files with playlist data - as I continued to dig into PHP (instead of stopping now that I know enough to tweak existing code and create new functionality). Here's a basic Track object in C# and PHP. I'll of course be elaborating on these as time goes by (and already have code for the C# implementation).

Read More

Shadow Hearts: Covenant leveling information

  • September 6, 2010
  • James Skemp
As I continue to look through my old files I found leveling information for Shadow Hearts: Covenant, from December 2005 to January (1st) 2006. I've converted it from an ODS file to XML, and am making it available. Shadow Hearts: Covenant leveling guide. Since I have a leveling guide for Shadow Hearts: From the New World (previously written about), it almost makes sense to go back and play the original Shadow Hearts to get information for that game as well.

Read More

Thoughts on the Kinect and Playstation Move

  • September 5, 2010
  • James Skemp
Laying aside the question of whether these are merely in response to the amount of money being made by the Wii, and whether the technology will be as lasting as history suggests 3D televisions will be, I've been thinking about the Kinect and Move recently. Here are my thoughts. How well will they work? This is the biggest question. Ever since they were first shown on television there's been the question of what environments will support the Kinect.

Read More

XML standards - personal suggestions

  • September 3, 2010
  • James Skemp
As I prepare to create another XML data file, I started looking at the standards I use to create XML files, and what the recommendations are. Elements In the past I've used camel case, but on a recent file used Pascal case instead. I think this was more becauase I've started to using Pascal case for public items (variables), and camel case for private items, as that's fairly standard in development.

Read More

Tic-Tac-Toe using Pascal

  • July 24, 2010
  • James Skemp
The following is a really old program (November 2003) written in Pacal using Bloodshed Dev-Pascal (which seems to no longer be updated). This is the code in main.pas, which it seems is the only file really necessary. This code is covered by a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 license. program TicTacToe (input, output); label begingame, picknumber, checkmove, checkforwin, compmove, winner, nobodywon, playagain, illegalmove, compcrash, endgame; var playmove, turn, points : integer; place1, place2, place3, place4, place5, place6, place7, place8, place9 : char; currentplayer, ynagain, lastwinner : char; begin writeln; writeln(‘JRSs Tic-Tac-Toe v1.

Read More

Dead? The digital download is barely out of its teens

  • May 22, 2010
  • James Skemp
Yesterday Slate posted an article by Farhad Manjoo titled The Digital Download Is Dead: How Google's music-streaming venture will change the gadget and entertainment worlds forever. After first, rightly, attacking Apple's iTunes and iPod (and related) platforms as being slow and unwieldy, especially on the predominate operating system Windows (not even mentioning Linux), and overall behind on the times, Farhad moves us from syncing our music collections out to the cloud.

Read More

Netflix on the Wii - my experience

  • May 13, 2010
  • James Skemp
After receiving my instant streaming disc for the Wii a long while back, I finally popped it in my Wii and gave it a try. For this experiment I watched three episodes of 30 Rock: Season 1. I wasn't expecting much for quality, and each episode isn't very long, so I thought I was giving the Wii a very good chance. Overall, I was extremely impressed in the entire experience, and definitely think Nintendo's own video channels can learn a lot.

Read More

Web Application Development Guidelines

  • February 27, 2010
  • James Skemp
While Web application development is just as complex as other application development, if not more so, it’s fairly difficult to find information on best practices while doing Web development. In order to move towards implementation of Subversion, I needed to write up documentation on how we’d use it. After a couple drafts, which I ended up scrapping almost completely, I came up with the below. In the interest of sharing, I’ve included the full document below, after removing the few instances where I had to specify a non-Subversion application (our help desk application).

Read More

Two simple ColdFusion calendar outputs

  • October 26, 2009
  • James Skemp
Here's two rough drafts of calendars created via ColdFusion (7, but I believe 6.1 would have the same functionality). Tables-based <cfparam name="URL.CalendarMonth" default="#Month(now())#" type="integer" /> <cfparam name="URL.CalendarYear" default="#Year(now())#" type="integer" /> <cfif URL.CalendarMonth LT 1 OR URL.CalendarMonth GT 12> <cfset URL.CalendarMonth = Month(now()) /> </cfif> <cfset VARIABLES.Calendar.StartDate = CreateDate(URL.CalendarYear, URL.CalendarMonth, 1) /> <table style="width:375px;" summary="Calendar of events for <cfoutput>#DateFormat(VARIABLES.Calendar.StartDate, 'mmmm yyyy')#</cfoutput>."> <thead> <tr> <th colspan="7"><cfoutput>#DateFormat(VARIABLES.Calendar.StartDate, "mmmm yyyy")#</cfoutput></th> </tr> <tr> <th>S</th> <th>M</th> <th>T</th> <th>W</th> <th>Th</th> <th>F</th> <th>S</th> </tr> </thead> <tbody> <cfloop from="

Read More

Linda Hamilton - 80s or 90s?

  • October 14, 2009
  • James Skemp
Previously posted on Facebook: 80's Linda Hamilton; sure, she did T2 in the 90s, but I bet if you think Linda Hamilton, you think 80s. Am I wrong? Rob Lumley brings up Terminator 2 as being his reason he'd go with 90s Hamilton. I'd agree with you on the Terminator franchise, but, obviously, not with Hamilton being better in the 90s solely because of T2. Look at IMDb - http://www.

Read More

Applications I have to install on my core development machine

  • October 9, 2009
  • James Skemp
Here's a listing of applications, as I run into them, that need to be installed on my core development machine. TortoiseSVN iTunes Oxygen Xml Editor Visual Studio CollabNet Subversion FileZilla FTP client Sun VirtualBox Serious Samurize 7-Zip Amazon MP3 Downloader Why bother creating this list? Because at the moment I've just upgraded to Windows 7 and need to reinstall my programs. Above is the order I did it.

Read More

Solved: Upgrading to Windows 7 on an HP a6360t with a second hard drive

  • October 9, 2009
  • James Skemp
I purchased an HP Pavilion a6360t with Windows Vista Home Premium and later upgraded it (due to a conference) for free to Windows Vista Ultimate, and then added a second hard drive. What would happen when I upgraded to Windows 7 Home Premium? Could I use the 64-bit version? The answer to these questions is, due to testing, below: Windows 7 Upgrading, doing a custom/clean install on my primary drive required approximately 38 minutes.

Read More

ColdFusion: cfscript to determine if variable exists and output html-escaped

  • October 8, 2009
  • James Skemp
There may be an easier way to do this in ColdFusion, but I finally created a function to determine whether a variable exists and if it does, returns in, all html-escaped. <cfscript> // Checks the passed CF variable to see if it exists, and if it does, outputs a trimmed and html-ready version of the value. function checkForValueOutput(data) { if (IsDefined(data)) { return HtmlEditFormat(Trim(Evaluate(data))); } else { return ""; } } </cfscript> (Obviously, this can rather easily be converted to a function.

Read More

Backing up a computer to an HP Pocket Media Drive

  • October 4, 2009
  • James Skemp
Recently I purchased another HP Pocket Media Drive, with 500 GB of space (instead of the 160 GB drives I had purchased before). Since I'd like to plan out my backup strategy, and need to backup for my upcoming Windows 7 install (which since I have Vista Ultimate, will require a deal of work), I decided to write this post. My computer's setup Currently I have a primary 450 GB hard drive (advertised as 500 GB) and a 700 GB secondary drive that I put in (advertised as 750 GB).

Read More

Parsing Yahoo! Music's Artist Web Services with C# and LINQ to XML - Search for artists

  • September 12, 2009
  • James Skemp
Similar to my post on parsing Last.fm's artist.getSimilar, I've been working with Yahoo! Music's Web services today. Unfortunately, Yahoo!'s services aren't quite as friendly as those made available by Last.fm. So that I remember, and others don't have to tackle this as well, here's the class I've created. (Download JamesRSkemp.WebServices.YahooMusic.cs.) /* Created by James Skemp - http://jamesrskemp.com/ Version 1.0 More information at http://strivinglife.com/words/post/Parsing-Yahoo!-Musics-Artist-Web-Services-with-C-and-LINQ-to-XML-Search-for-artists.aspx Shared under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 United States License - http://creativecommons.

Read More

On the Saying "I can't wait"

  • September 12, 2009
  • James Skemp
I would be willing to bet that at least 90% of the time when someone uses the phrase "I can't wait" they're lying. What made me realize this is when I read a comment the other day regarding a video game's review. In this comment the individual had basically stated that they couldn't wait for the game. At the time of their comment, however, the game was already in stores and available for purchase.

Read More

Parsing Last.fm Web Services' artist.getSimilar with C# and LINQ to XML

  • September 12, 2009
  • James Skemp
The following covers how to parse the XML response of artist.getSimilar, from Last.fm's Web Services. Setup and assumptions The first step is sign up for a free API account at Last.fm. You'll also need to target .NET Framework 3.5 when you setup your project, so as to access LINQ functionality. When writing the steps listed below, I was working on a Windows Forms Application, but the steps should be the same, or very similar, for other project types.

Read More

Muenchian Method grouping in XSLT

  • July 1, 2009
  • James Skemp
I owe a deal of thanks for figuring out the Muenchian Method of grouping in XSLT (1.0) to Jeni's article Grouping Using the Muenchian Method. It took, however, a while for me to get my mind around the method completely, and some experimentation, which I'm sharing below. Specifically I was looking to get a listing of tracks, from my iTunes Playlists to Xml application's output, and group them by album.

Read More

On Self Control

  • June 29, 2009
  • James Skemp
There's a difference between self control and killing something off. Self control is when you hunger for something, but say no. Killing something off is when you no longer hunger for something. The former is a near-constant struggle, depending upon how often the hunger makes itself known, while the latter is, once the desire is killed, relatively easy, except perhaps during moments of rememberence. Trying to remember what it was like to have a hunger/desire of a particular sort, can be, at times, more painful than the desire itself.

Read More

Programmatic SQL command timeout using a SqlDataSource (C#)

  • June 24, 2009
  • James Skemp
Granted, in the case where this came up, I should have moved away from a SqlDataSource, but I wrote it using one, and a re-write isn't possible at the moment. So, I had to find a way yesterday to programmatically set the command timeout of a select, using a SqlDataSource (that was programmatically written). After much research, I found that you have to set the timeout on selecting. After opening a dummy document to see if I could determine how it was normally done, I came up with something like the following:

Read More

Programmatic MSSQL data source in ASP.NET (C#) without System.Web

  • June 6, 2009
  • James Skemp
In a similar article I detailed how I was doing programmatic access of Microsoft SQL Server. However, on another project I was creating a class in App_Code. Using my method required the use of a couple additional namespaces from System.Web. That seemed a bit excessive. So I did some digging around and came up with what I believe is a better solution, for use in classes/non-Web code. First, the following must be included in.

Read More

Programmatic MSSQL data source in ASP.NET (C#)

  • June 1, 2009
  • James Skemp
I keep having to search through code to find it, so, since writing about it makes it easier for me to find ... here's how I've been programmatically making calls to Microsoft SQL Server. If I'm doing something wrong, please comment below or send me an email. Some times have been changed to dummy values. SqlDataSource dataSource = new SqlDataSource(); dataSource.ConnectionString = ConfigurationManager.ConnectionStrings["ConnectionString"].ConnectionString; dataSource.SelectCommand = "stored_proc"; dataSource.SelectCommandType = SqlDataSourceCommandType.StoredProcedure; dataSource.SelectParameters.Add("id", value); dataSource.

Read More

On Achievements and Trophies

  • May 16, 2009
  • James Skemp
To a very large extent, I consider myself to be a gamer. Around the time the NES came out, my family picked up an Atari 2600, used. I don't know who sold it to us, but I can remember going with my dad to pick it up at my school's playground (that was the meeting place). At a later point we picked up an NES, via my dad, and then my mom bought us a SNES.

Read More

Upgrading Subversion 1.5.x to 1.6.0 on Windows Vista - checklist

  • March 23, 2009
  • James Skemp
The following is how I went about performing an upgrade of Subversion 1.5.4 to Subversion 1.6.0. For this I'll be continuing to use the current Windows build of Apache 2.2.x, TortoiseSVN, and of course Subversion. At this time, that's Subversion 1.6.0, TortoiseSVN 1.6.0, and Apache 2.2.11. Determine current setup. Opening the Apache Service Monitor will show the version of Apache and Subversion. In my case, that's 2.

Read More

On J. Sheridan LeFanu's Green Tea

  • March 7, 2009
  • James Skemp
This article contains spoilers regarding Green Tea. If you do not wish to know how this story progresses and ends, please stop reading. In J. Sheridan LeFanu's Green Tea (1871) we learn the story of the Rev. Mr. Jennings, through the letters of Dr. Hesselius. As Jennings accounts to him, he became afflicted by a peculiar malady. It happened one day, having began a work "upon the religious metaphysics of the ancients," which was "not good for" "the Christian mind.

Read More

Configuration files for Windows Forms Applications

  • March 5, 2009
  • James Skemp
Since I know I'll run across this again ... In my iTunes Playlists to Xml application I wanted to allow users the ability to persist their name across sessions. The supported method seems to be using application configuration files; in my case, something like iTunesApplication.exe.config. However, try as I could, I just couldn't find anything solid on how to create the configuration file. First, I had to add a reference to "System.

Read More

What The Boss means to me; an open letter to Bruce Springsteen

  • February 18, 2009
  • James Skemp
Mr. Bruce Springsteen, While I can't remember the exact date, or even the year, it was shortly after my parents had divorced, and my father moved out into the country, that I first listened to Born in the U.S.A.; it was one of my father's old tapes. Now, I really wonder that I didn't wear that old tape out. I was pre-teen, and living in northern Wisconsin, and raised Catholic, so not all of the lyrics made sense (not that I really thought about them all that much outside of remembering the exact order, so I could sing the songs by heart), so in that sense, I certainly was lacking an understanding of what they really meant.

Read More

On "Shafty"

  • February 17, 2009
  • James Skemp
the terrible thing about hell is that when you're there you can't even tell as you move through this life you love so you could be there and not even know but you say so what I'm doing just fine the irony is that it's all in your mind and that's why hell is so vicious and cruel but you'll just go on an oblivious fool (Phish/Marshall.

Read More

New attack options for Battleship

  • January 20, 2009
  • James Skemp
To some extent, the game Battleship is fairly out of date. With today's technology, are we really calling attacks on individual areas at a time? For this reason, I put forward the following attack additions. Requirements are for the player using these attacks. Tactical Strike Requires an undamaged submarine. Give up one turn. If, on the next turn, your submarine is still unharmed, attack a 3x3 grid on the opposing player.

Read More

XML-based CD library: Draft layout

  • January 9, 2009
  • James Skemp
Following close on the heels of my XML-based book library draft (and release), below is a draft layout for keeping track of my CDs. Here's what I currently track: Artist CD Name Date bought Place bought Bought price Number of songs Time (which I don't fill in very often) Misc info/notes Following the iTunes standard, each CD has a main artist.

Read More

XML-based book library: Draft layout

  • January 3, 2009
  • James Skemp
01/03/2009 @ 10:39 CT: The current version of the XML Schema I came up with is available for public use at http://media.jamesrskemp.com/xsd/MyBooks.xsd Currently I have a SQL database (converted from an Access database) of all of the books that I own, as well as when I read them, how much I paid, etcetera. Since I'm moving a good deal of information into XML, I figured I'd attempt to move this into XML as well.

Read More

Shadow Hearts: From the New World leveling information

  • December 27, 2008
  • James Skemp
A leveling 'guide' for Shadow Hearts: From the New World is now available; Shadow Hearts: From the New World leveling. Not only should it have been written up and posted a while ago, it gave me a good chance to use XSD (XML Schema Definition). I tried creating one for my tracking my vehicles' gas usage, but failed. Having worked through the issues on this one, I think I now know what I did wrong.

Read More

Parse FileZilla Server logs with Log Parser

  • November 23, 2008
  • James Skemp
While FileZilla Server is one of the best FTP servers available, it's logging leaves much to be desired. However, after a couple of hours, I've created a script for Log Parser that will generate a W3C log from FileZilla Server's logs. Save the following to a file, for example, FileZillaServer.sql: SELECT  SUBSTR(Text, 1, SUB(INDEX_OF(Text, ')'), 1)) AS RequestNumber  , TO_TIMESTAMP(   TRIM(    SUBSTR(     Text     , ADD(INDEX_OF(Text, ')'), 1)

Read More

Connecting to a WRT54G with a HP iPAQ 110

  • October 4, 2008
  • James Skemp
After playing around with settings, I was finally able to access my wireless network with my HP iPAQ 110. Here's what I did. Under Wireless > Wireless Security, set the model to WEP, setting a passphrase and generating keys. Make sure your wireless is enabled. Once the network shows in your iPAQ, set the Authentication to Shared and the Data Encryption to WEP. Select the key index and enter the key equal to the Default Transmit Key from the WRT54G.

Read More

Brief Notes on Essential C# 3.0: For .NET Framework 3.5 (2nd Edition)

  • August 16, 2008
  • James Skemp
I'll be updating this as I read, but the date/time of the post will remain the same. This will by no means make up for a reading of the book - Essential C# 3.0: For .NET Framework 3.5 (2nd Edition). (Link to my review will be posted once I finish the book.) I work primarily on the Web, so that will be my main focus from reading this book. Some chapters may not be present here, depending upon what I think is note-worthy at the time.

Read More

On the purpose of life (with a bonus on the meaning of life)

  • July 10, 2008
  • James Skemp
It's been a while since I've written a philosophical piece, so please be kind. Two necessary definitions First, we must begin with definitions1 of the key words in our topic. life: 1 a. The property or quality that distinguishes living organisms from dead organisms and inanimate matter, manifested in functions such as metabolism, growth, reproduction, and response to stimuli or adaptation to the environment originating from within the organism.

Read More

Collection down after opening - resolution

  • June 16, 2008
  • James Skemp
We've been running into an issue, off and on, with ColdFusion MX 7.0.2 having issues with Verity collections. During one of our nightly jobs, two Verity collections are purged, through ColdFusion, and then re-built.  Sometimes this will bring the collection down, resulting in a message like the following. Collection down after opening (10) Using the mdvdk executable, you can get some information about the collection, and even bring it back up.

Read More

Dynamic user-controlled layout in a CMS

  • May 25, 2008
  • James Skemp
This article is meant to hold some of the thoughts that I've been having about allowing a user to control the layout of a page, in particular for use within a content management system (CMS). The system would need to be able to support a user creating templates easily, but hopefully without the use of tables. In the CSS Advanced Layout Module, there is a draft specification for Template-based positioning.

Read More

On New York

  • May 24, 2008
  • James Skemp
This article contains my own opinionated opinion only. Why do most crime dramas take place in New York? Why does New York, along with Hollywood, think that they are the center of the United States? Of all the states and cities, New York is probably the most ego-centric, after all, how many cities share the name of the state that they are in? (Low-blow.) What follows is more questions, than answers, that stem from my thoughts on New York.

Read More

Can A Good Man Do No Evil? Is Zatoichi A Good Man?

  • February 23, 2008
  • James Skemp
Pre-emptive clarifications First, by a ‘good man’ we specifically mean here one who is truly good. By ‘good’ we mean one who, by their actions, attempts to decrease the amount of evil. By ‘evil’ we mean those actions which are disruptive towards a social, unified, ordered, society. For example, murder, theft and pillaging. This by no means exhausts all potential issues with the below, but if one assumes the common definitions, it should make sense.

Read More

Quick and dirty conversions to FLV (Flash Video)

  • February 23, 2008
  • James Skemp
I purchased a Casio EX-Z1200 a bit ago, which I've been playing around with. Overall, I've been very happy with it, however, it outputs movies to the MOV format. While this seemed great for Apple, it wasn't the best for me. After testing out QuickTime Pro (7. something) and Ulead Movie Wizard 3.2 SE VCD (which came with the camera), I was about to settle for less than I hoped for.

Read More

Who really wins when ads are added to free content?

  • December 22, 2007
  • James Skemp
Ramblings at this point. I probably won't clean them up, but I might.  Ars technica has a post, Microsoft patent could force downloaders to view commercials, regarding advertising before the playing and/or downloading of online content. Microsoft's patent application, titled Enforcing Advertising Playback For Downloaded Media Content, describes systems that are based both on tokens and DRM which would prohibit playing a media file unless its accompanying advertising is viewed.

Read More

Notes on Immanuel Kant's Critique of Pure Reason: I. Transcendental Doctrine of Elements: Second Part. Transcendental Logic: Introduction

  • December 17, 2007
  • James Skemp
The following are notes to the Introduction of the Second Part (the Transcendental Logic) of the Transcendental Doctrine of Elements of Immanuel Kant's Critique of Pure Reason. For the months of December 2007 and January 2008, I'll be reading the Critique and writing notes as I go. For all citations, I am using the edition published by Palgrave Macmillan (ISBN 1-4039-1195-9), and translated by Norman Kemp Smith. The following article covers pages 92 to 101 of this edition.

Read More

Notes on Immanuel Kant's Critique of Pure Reason: I. Transcendental Doctrine of Elements: First Part. Transcendental Aesthetic: General Observations and Conclusion

  • December 16, 2007
  • James Skemp
The following are notes to the General Observations on, and the Conclusion of the, Transcendental Aesthetic, of the First Part (the Transcendental Aesthetic) of the Transcendental Doctrine of Elements of Immanuel Kant's Critique of Pure Reason. For the months of December 2007 and January 2008, I'll be reading the Critique and writing notes as I go. For all citations, I am using the edition published by Palgrave Macmillan (ISBN 1-4039-1195-9), and translated by Norman Kemp Smith.

Read More

Notes on Immanuel Kant's Critique of Pure Reason: I. Transcendental Doctrine of Elements: First Part. Transcendental Aesthetic: Space and Time

  • December 9, 2007
  • James Skemp
The following are notes on Section I and II, on Space and Time, to the First Part (the Transcendental Aesthetic) of the Transcendental Doctrine of Elements of Immanuel Kant's Critique of Pure Reason. For the month of December 2007, I'll be reading the Critique and writing notes as I go. For all citations, I am using the edition published by Palgrave Macmillan (ISBN 1-4039-1195-9), and translated by Norman Kemp Smith.

Read More

Notes on Immanuel Kant's Critique of Pure Reason: I. Transcendental Doctrine of Elements: First Part. Transcendental Aesthetic: Introduction

  • December 6, 2007
  • James Skemp
The following are notes on the Introduction to the First Part (the Transcendental Aesthetic) of the Transcendental Doctrine of Elements of Immanuel Kant's Critique of Pure Reason. For the month of December 2007, I'll be reading the Critique and writing notes as I go. For all citations, I am using the edition published by Palgrave Macmillan (ISBN 1-4039-1195-9), and translated by Norman Kemp Smith. The following article covers pages 65 to 67 of this edition.

Read More

Notes on Immanuel Kant's Critique of Pure Reason: Introduction

  • December 3, 2007
  • James Skemp
The following are notes on the Introduction of Immanuel Kant's Critique of Pure Reason. For the month of December 2007, I'll be reading the Critique and writing notes as I go. For all citations, I am using the edition published by Palgrave Macmillan (ISBN 1-4039-1195-9), and translated by Norman Kemp Smith. The following article covers pages 41 to 62 of this edition. Having now covered the two Prefaces, we find ourself at Kant's Introduction to the Critique of Pure Reason.

Read More

Notes on Immanuel Kant's Critique of Pure Reason: Preface to Second Edition

  • December 2, 2007
  • James Skemp
The following are notes on the Preface of the second edition of Immanuel Kant's Critique of Pure Reason. For the month of December 2007, I'll be reading the Critique and writing notes as I go. For all citations, I am using the edition published by Palgrave Macmillan (ISBN 1-4039-1195-9), and translated by Norman Kemp Smith. The following article covers pages 17 to 37 of this edition. There's quite a difference from the first edition's Preface to the second's.

Read More

Notes on Immanuel Kant's Critique of Pure Reason: Preface to First Edition

  • November 30, 2007
  • James Skemp
The following are notes on the Preface of the first edition of Immanuel Kant's Critique of Pure Reason. For the month of December 2007, I'll be reading the Critique and writing notes as I go. For all citations, I am using the edition published by Palgrave Macmillan (ISBN 1-4039-1195-9), and translated by Norman Kemp Smith. The following article covers pages 7 to 15 of this edition. According to Kant, human beings find themselves asking questions which can be neither ignored, nor answered.

Read More

Playstation 3 and the Linksys WRT54G Wireless-G Boardband Router

  • November 24, 2007
  • James Skemp
While I initially hooked up my Playstation 3 a week ago, when I was posting to the official PS forums today, my second post, I was doing so to recommend a version of the router I'm using. Since both items are pretty popular now, it makes sense to write up a quick guide on them, I suppose. My equipment First off, there's my setup. I've had pretty experiences with Linksys, but poor experiences with Netgear, so Linksys I am.

Read More

Sony Bravia KDL-32M3000 comments: 2 weeks later

  • November 17, 2007
  • James Skemp
In the beginning of this month, I purchased a 32" Sony Bravia. In the two weeks that I've had the television, I've run into a couple of things that I would like the television to offer. In no particular order, they are listed below. Better volume detection Maybe it's because the speakers are better on this tv than my old one, but there's definitely an issue with commercial versus programming volumes.

Read More

Game Informer and the Xbox 360 / Playstation 3 debate

  • November 11, 2007
  • James Skemp
In this world, there's a number of people who get paid for playing video games. I am not one of those people. This is a good reason to trust the people, with a grain of salt, when it comes to said video games. Recently, I've been trying to decide between an Xbox 360 and a Playstation 3, for my next-gen console, since we all know that the Wii isn't next-gen.

Read More

Thoughts on primary and secondary sources

  • November 9, 2007
  • James Skemp
Recently, Gavin Schmitt asked me what my thoughts were on philosophy books about philosophers. Does that ever bother you, by the way? Philosophy books about other philosophers? Either you read it ahead of time and you don't know what the hell the author is talking about, or you read it afterwards and you end up not recalling the exact passages the author is referring to. It's like you need a FIRM grasp on the material to appreciate a book on the philosopher, but if you have that firm grasp you probably don't need to read the book (besides as a refresher).

Read More

W3C extended log format fields and IIS 6.0

  • November 6, 2007
  • James Skemp
In a previous article, I gave an overview of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) extended log format, in relation to Internet Information Services (IIS) 6.0. This time, I'd like to cover what each field provides, again in relation to IIS and a Web site, for statistical and debugging purposes. What fields are available Again, we've covered what fields are available in the W3C extended log format in a previous article.

Read More

My new television, the Sony Bravia

  • November 3, 2007
  • James Skemp
Today I purchased a new television, to replace my tried-and-true Philips 20". After a couple of months of research, and etcetera, I decided to go with a Sony Bravia. Since my previous television was a 20", purchased back during my sophmore or junior year of college, and still using 'tube' technology, I figured it was time to upgrade, especially since I've been watching more movies via Netflix, and am planning on purchasing one of the current next-gen video game systems (P3 or 360).

Read More

Gavin Schmitt: Questions and Answers 1

  • October 31, 2007
  • James Skemp
In January and March of 2005, I asked Gavin Schmitt, of The Framing Business and Gavin War Journal, a number of questions. Those questions, and the respective answers, have been posted below. Since his answers may have changed since early 2005, I'll be adding any additional comments he may have to the answers below. 1) I'm about to read your writings - why should I? In all honesty, you probably shouldn't.

Read More

Perceptions of Immanuel Kant Before a Reading of the Critique of Pure Reason

  • October 30, 2007
  • James Skemp
In 2003, I received a bachelor's in philosophy from the University of Wisconsin: Green Bay. During my four and a half years at Green Bay, I studied a deal of philosophy, without ever really deciding that I'd go for a degree in philosophy; philosophy was actually meant to just satisfy the necessary requirement of picking a degree in my sophmore year. Nonetheless, gradate with philosophy I did. During those years, I studied a number of philosophers, some more than others.

Read More

Determining which IIS 6.0 Application Pool belongs to which application

  • October 6, 2007
  • James Skemp
In IIS 6.0, you can setup Application Pools for each of your sites. My knowledge of the exact benefits of this is somewhat lacking, but what I do understand is that these help applications (Web sites) stay within their own bounds, and prevent them from having a bad effect upon each other. For example, if one application is preforming poorly, as long as it's not a server-wide issue, the other sites on the server will be impacted minimally.

Read More

Paranoia Agent Prophetic Vision Comparisons

  • September 23, 2007
  • James Skemp
The following is a comparison of the English-spoken and English-subtitled Prophetic Vision segments of Paranoia Agent. An analysis of said segments may will be included in this article, or in a future article. Where differences are present, the text is parenthesized, along with either -s or -e; -s means that the text is present in the subtitles, but not the spoken version, while -e means that the language is present in the spoken version, but not in the subtitles.

Read More

Brief notes on marriage and children

  • September 22, 2007
  • James Skemp
The following are merely notes that will eventually be expanded upon in a longer article. For most of us, from our earliest days we are taught that one day we will become an adult, get married, and have children. Depending upon where you grow up, what your parents think of higher education, and what their thoughts are regarding said education, going to college may also be a part of the prescribed future.

Read More

Brief thoughts on detached hands

  • August 24, 2007
  • James Skemp
Question: Is my detached hand me? Id est, if someone were to cut my hand off and place it on a table, could one say that that hand is me (James Skemp)? I reply: A part of me, yes. But, so too is the rest of my, otherwise whole, body. So, saying "this is x," where 'this' refers to a part of 'x,' no matter what the part, is the same, in some sense, of saying that of any other part.

Read More

On Love - Thoughts from movies

  • August 6, 2007
  • James Skemp
The following quotes are from movies. At the moment, it's just the two, but, more shall surely come. Look. The supermodel's a beautiful girl, Will. She can make you dizzy, like you've been drinking Jack all morning. She can make you feel high for the greatest commodity known to man - promise, the promise of a better day, the promise of a greater hope, the promise of a new tomorrow.

Read More

On Love - Thoughts from others - Bruce Springsteen

  • August 6, 2007
  • James Skemp
I've been a fan of Bruce Springsteen since I first listened to the album Born in the USA (on cassette), way back, many, many years ago. Most of the music/songs that I enjoy are because of women, but Bruce Springsteen is one of the few artists that I enjoy because of a man. In this case, my father had the tape, but it was women who gave the music true meaning.

Read More

On Love - Thoughts from others - Harlan Ellison

  • August 6, 2007
  • James Skemp
Harlan Ellison is one of those authors who not only writes interesting things, but is also quite an interesting character himself (like Chuck Palahniuk, and Philip K. Dick). One of Ellison's major themes is love. He's written a good deal about it, and while I'm doing my research on love, I couldn't exclude Ellison. What follows are quotes from Ellison's pieces that reference that thing called love .

Read More

If you're not in Google, you're probably dead

  • July 29, 2007
  • James Skemp
A few weeks ago, I believe, a coworker and I were talking about Google, in particular, how he happens to search for people, he once knew, online. Of course, I don't think I know anyone who hasn't at least done this once (even if that individual they searched for happened to be themselves). The question is, is it true that, if someone can't find a record of you online, that you're dead?

Read More

Ubuntu Quickie: MySQL and PostgreSQL passwords

  • June 23, 2007
  • James Skemp
Another Ubuntu Quickie, this time on the default passwords for MySQL and PostgreSQL. MySQL mysql -u root UPDATE mysql.user SET Password = OLD_PASSWORD(’password’) WHERE User = ‘root’; FLUSH PRIVILEGES; \q PostgreSQL sudo -u postgres psql template1 ALTER USER postgres WITH PASSWORD ‘password’; \q

Read More

Reference: PostgreSQL 8.2 commands on Ubuntu

  • June 23, 2007
  • James Skemp

Below are the PostgreSQL 8.2 commands on Ubuntu.

Read More

Ubuntu Quickie: Installing MySQL and PostgreSQL

  • June 21, 2007
  • James Skemp

For SQL on Ubuntu Linux, I decided it was easiest to just use the repositories to just install MySQL and PostgreSQL.

Read More

Configuring Apache for per-user pages

  • June 18, 2007
  • James Skemp

In a previous post, I covered installing Apache 2.2.4 on Ubuntu. Unfortunately, if you want to create content for this server, you need to either use the root account, or change the permissions on the /usr/local/apache2/htdocs directory. Let's keep things that way.

Read More

Quickie: Install ColdFusion 7.02 on Ubuntu 7.04 with Apache 2.2.4

  • June 15, 2007
  • James Skemp

Once again, may not be the best, but installing ColdFusion 7.02 on Ubuntu 7.04 (Apache 2.2.4 already installed).

Read More

Quickie: Install Apache 2.2.4 on Ubuntu

  • June 15, 2007
  • James Skemp
May not be the best, but ... here's how I installed Apache 2.2.4 on Ubuntu (7.04), based on David Winter's guide Building Apache 2.2 from source for Ubuntu Dapper. All code from a terminal, unless otherwise noted. sudo apt-get install build-essential cd mkdir src cd src I downloaded zlib from http://www.zlib.net/ (zlib source code, version 1.2.3, tar.gz format) into the src folder, and extracted it to the same.

Read More

On the Dangers of "Is and Is Not Not"

  • June 10, 2007
  • James Skemp

Logically speaking, the rule of Double Negation tells us that p :: ~~p. In order words, if something is blue, it is not not blue. Unfortunately, this is one of the rules for sentential logic that is philosophically troubling.

Read More

Review of Andrew Fiala's Practical Pacifism

  • May 26, 2007
  • James Skemp

This is the review that I wrote for Amazon.com for the book Practical Pacifism by Andrew Fiala.

Read More

Review of Brian J. Robb's Counterfeit Worlds

  • May 26, 2007
  • James Skemp

This is the review that I wrote for Amazon.com for the book Counterfeit Worlds by Brian J. Robb.

Read More

Cho Seung-Hui Against All: On Societies Need to Ostracize the Ill

  • April 20, 2007
  • James Skemp

“These wars, famines, floods and quakes meet well-defined needs. Man wants chaos. In fact, he’s gotta have it. Depression, strife, riots, murder, all this dread. We’re irresistibly drawn to that almost orgiastic state created out of death and destruction. It’s in all of us. We revel in it. Sure, the media tries to put a sad face on these things, painting them up as great human tragedies. But we all know the function of the media has never been to eliminate the evils of the world, no. Their job is to persuade us to accept those evils and get used to living with them. The powers that be want us to be passive observers.” - Waking Life

Unfortunately, I haven’t kept up all that much with the recent (April 17, 2007) shootings in Virginia. However, I’ve seen and heard a disturbing trend, namely the dehumanizing and ostracizing of the shooter, Cho Seung-Hui. Quite frankly, this is disturbing.

What’s truly disturbing about this situation is that no one seems to realize exactly what they’re doing. While it’s true that the killing of 32 people is regrettable, that does not give anyone the right to ‘erase’ the killer.

Read More

The Biological Imperative : or argument I get into

  • March 24, 2007
  • James Skemp

The following article was written by Robert Wood, and is reprinted here with his permission. As such, Robert Wood retains all copyrights on this piece. Comments to Robert about this article can be left below (no registration required).

Pink mice and Hank

Read More

Installing Apache 2.2.4 to a Windows-based computer, locally: Part 1

  • March 17, 2007
  • James Skemp

In February 2006, I wrote an article covering the installation of Apache 1.3.34, which can be found on my site, StrivingLife.net. In August 2006, I covered the installation of Apache 2.0.59. This time, I'll be covering the installation of the current version of Apache 2.2.x, Apache 2.2.4, to a Windows XP machine, for the purpose of local development.

Read More

Schopenhauer's Prefaces to The World as Will and Representation

  • February 11, 2007
  • James Skemp

Arthur Schopenhauer's The World as Will and Representation (Die Welt als Wille und Vorstellung) went through three editions in Schopenhauer's lifetime, and accordingly there are three prefaces, one for each edition. The first was written in 1818, the second in 1844, and the third in 1859.

Read More

Determining 3D Distances and Angles

  • September 4, 2006
  • James Skemp
Near the top of one of the sections in the POV-Ray™ 3.5 manual there is a quote about wishing that past mathematical formulas were remembered, or something to that effect. I too wish I had remembered what I had learned in some of my past math classes, but after a bit of research, I have begun to work on some of the information that I have forgotten. Here is one of those areas.

Read More

Initial thoughts on a square image canvas for fractals

  • June 9, 2006
  • James Skemp

I've been a part of a number of boards in my years, but the one that I've probably stayed on with for the longest is the board at Fractovia. In response to an image, I mentioned the canvas which turned into it's own thread (Squares?). Here's my intial reply, which I just had to save:

Read More

Logical coding

  • May 28, 2006
  • James Skemp

When it comes to proper coding, you should know the most important rule of all; LIFO. However, not even LIFO nor the W3C can really tell you which order to put certain elements. In the nature of Web 2.0, I'll discuss some of the standards I've been bouncing around for HTML text markup when the same text is given multiple attributes.

LIFO

Read More

Does in-game advertising really hurt video games?

  • April 23, 2006
  • James Skemp

Just for purchasing a discount card at a local video store (GameStop), I not only got a year of 10% off video games, I also picked up a free one-year subscription to Game Informer. Not too bad for $15. In this month's issue, Issue 157 (May 2006), there's a page of debate (yes and no) to the question of whether or not in-game advertising really hurts video games. In this post, I'll be looking at the two responses, as well as crafting my own response to this question.

Read More

Cross Sums Number Combinations Guide

  • April 13, 2006
  • James Skemp

Quite a while ago - back in May of 2003 actually - I began work on a guide that would display every possible number combination for cross sum puzzles. Since then, a number of people have corrected mistakes that crept in, resulting in a number of different versions of the guide over the last (almost) two years.

Read More

Bertrand Russell's Problems of Philosophy: Notes and Comments - Chapter XV: The Value of Philosophy

  • October 29, 2005
  • James Skemp

Description: Notes and comments on Chapter 15 of Bertrand Russell’s Problems of Philosophy, sufficiently forming an overview.

Created: December 31 2004
Modified: October 29 2005

Read More

Fictional band names

  • September 19, 2005
  • James Skemp
The following is a listing of fictional band names, which I have thought up. While I believe there was a story regarding the first two, I can't seem to find it (I'm posting these on September 2, 2007, so quite some time has gone by since thinking these up) ... Delicious Nutritious Déjà vu Child Peace Pipe The third seems too much like an album by Sir Paul, to be of much good these days .

Read More

Corporate Clarity #005-09-08-001

  • September 8, 2005
  • James Skemp
To: All Staff From: Institutional Technology and Services (ITS) It has come to our attention that a number of staff members are using so-called ‘insecure’ passwords. A ‘secure’ password is typically defined as a password with a combination of numbers, letters, and special characters, like spaces ( ), periods (.), and punctuation marks (like ‘!’ and ‘?’). An ‘insecure’ password, on the other hand, is typically defined as an easily guessed word, like ‘password’, ‘me’, ‘help’, various other four letter words, and the ever popular ‘god’.

Read More

Are the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles Really Ninjas?

  • September 4, 2005
  • James Skemp

Description: Are the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles really ninjas, or are they something else?

According to Robert Hamburger, and Real Ultimate Power,

Read More

On Natalie Portman

  • July 24, 2005
  • James Skemp

Description: On Ms. Natalie Portman.

Created: July 24th 2005

Modified: n/a

Read More

Why Should We Care About Strangers? Or Should We?

  • July 6, 2005
  • James Skemp

Back when I was in college, I can recall talking to one Ms. Tessa Gruszynski regarding how, basically, I was going to stop caring about, or being kind to, strangers. I believe the particular item was holding open doors for people who would make no gesture of thanks.

Of course, I continued to open doors for people.

Read More

Corporate Clarity #005-06-20-001

  • June 20, 2005
  • James Skemp
***CONFIDENTIAL*** ***FOR TEAM LEADERSHIP ONLY*** ***PLEASE SHRED IF FOUND*** It’s come to my attention that a number of team players have been taking full sixty minute lunch breaks in the past couple of weeks. As I’m sure you all recall from our last outing in late April, most of our team players had been taking anywhere between thirty and fifty minute lunch breaks.  It’s quite surprising, with these figures in mind, that our team players are now taking sixty minute breaks.

Read More

Unreal Tournament and the HP Pavilion a620n

  • June 12, 2005
  • James Skemp

I was sceptical whether my machine, a HP Pavilion a620n, with standard specifications, could play Unreal Tournament 2004. Since I had a couple of hours to kill, late one night, I decided I would try downloading the demo, to see if it would run on my machine. I had previously downloaded the Unreal Tournament 2003 demo as well, to also see if I could get that to run, and had bought the Unreal Tournament, Game of the Year Edition, for an older computer. To make a long opening short, this guide is going to go over Unreal Tournament and the HP Pavilion a620n, with standard specifications (id est, no altercations). If you're using this computer, and would like to use one of these programs, I'm going to tell you if you can.

For those that don't have the HP Pavilion a620n, a little about the machine. It has a 3200+ AMD Athlon XP processor (which is 2.2 GHz), with 512 MB of PC2700 DDR SDRAM, and 64 MB of shared video memory (yuck). It's got a 160 GB hard drive, an 8x DVD+RW/CD-RW, along with a 48x CD-ROM. So, it's not a high-end machine, but it's certainly not quite that old yet. The machine comes standard with Windows XP SP1, which I have left on the machine (not quite ready to update to SP2 yet).

Read More

Why I Don't Have 'Friends'

  • June 10, 2005
  • James Skemp

Description: A brief article on why I personally don't have friends, with some discussion of what friends may be.

Created: June 10th 2005

Modified: n/a

Read More

Corporate Clarity #005-06-03-001

  • June 3, 2005
  • James Skemp
Dear Team, What would you think about us slowing down the search display so that we can have a small, non-obtrusive, flash animation of a running man, or rambling mouse? This way, our users would be completely entertained while waiting for their search results. Thanks for your consideration of this important idea, Your Web Development Team Notes Created: June 3rd 2005 Modified: June 20th 2005

Read More

Arthur Schopenhauer's Principle of Sufficient Reason

  • June 1, 2005
  • James Skemp

Description: A brief article regarding Arthur Schopenhauer's principle of sufficient reason, discussed in his work On the Fourfold Root of the Principle of Sufficient Reason.

Created: January 21st - 22nd 2004
Modified: February 6th 2004; June 14th 2004; April 27th 2005; June 1st 2005

Arthur Schopenhauer is an extremely self-referential philosopher, perhaps the most self-referential of all the great philosophers. Yet, this is due primarily to the fact that Schopenhauer is one of the few philosophers that sticks with one system throughout his life - throughout his writings.

Read More

The Man Born on the Day of God's Rest - Marciello Punto, Domingo

  • May 19, 2005
  • James Skemp

Description: A short biography of a man with little available biographical information, Marciello Punto, Domingo.

Created: May 18th 2005

Modified: May 19th 2005

Read More

Is Volunteering Equal to Donating, and Vice Versa?

  • May 6, 2005
  • James Skemp

While reading a past news item regarding the Young Lawyers Division of the State Bar of Wisconsin, I asked myself if donating was equal to volunteering. The Young Lawyers Division (YLD) collects business clothing from lawyers to give to lawyers who cannot afford business clothing. If lawyer X donates clothing to the YLD, is lawyer X volunteering? To get to the answer to this question, I have to proof that volunteering implies, or suggests, donating, and that donating implies volunteering. If either is not the case, or if both are not the case, then volunteering is not the same as donating.

Read More

Can we blame hosts for their poor HTML editors?

  • April 30, 2005
  • James Skemp

Description: A short article on HTML editors provided by Web site hosts.

Created: April 30th 2005

Modified: n/a

Read More

On the Saying 'Is it better to live a lie, or know the truth and cry?'

  • April 27, 2005
  • James Skemp

Back on the second of February 2002, I first, as far as I can recall or prove, wrote down the question “Is it better to live a lie, or know the truth and cry?” The item that this was written in was an item called Guide to One Philosophy of Life: Revision 1, and consisted of twelve pages of material from January 30, 2002 to September 29, 2002. While I kept saying that I was going to get back to it and revise it, I never did.

A recent item on a LiveJournal journal, along with something I had read earlier in the day on the same area, reminded me of this quote that I had written so long ago. After some searching, I found it in the item mentioned above.

Read More

Natalie Portman

  • April 5, 2005
  • James Skemp

Is it your brown hair
that makes me need more air?

Read More

Fractal Explorer: Creating Your Own Fractals

  • March 6, 2005
  • James Skemp

Learning a program can be quite fun and rewarding, but can also be somewhat disarming. While there were a number of guides on the Internet that discussed Fractal Explorer, I felt that none of them did any great service to this great program. So, I set out to create my own guide, in a format that did not force a user to view only a small amount of information at a time.

Guides can be downloaded in Adobe PDF format only.

Read More

On The Lady or the Tiger, and Other 'Questions with no answers' in the Media

  • February 19, 2005
  • James Skemp

In Frank Stockton’s 1882 piece The Lady or the Tiger, Stockton asks us to determine the ending of the story. While one thinks they have enough information to make an informed decision and come to the correct answer, they in fact do not. His later piece, The Discourager of Hesitancy, also continues this tradition. Of course, Stockton is not the only writer to use this method to capture an audience. However, Stockton is one of the few to take this method to such a level. For this article I’ll be discussing Stockton’s pieces, as well as other cases of this in the media, including Tarantino’s movie Pulp Fiction.

The Lady or the Tiger? and The Discourager of Hesitancy

I had the privilege to read The Lady or the Tiger in one of my middle school or high school English courses. For those who have not read this extremely interesting piece, I highly suggest that you do. For those who have not, or for those who have not read this piece in a while, I include the following overview of the story.

Read More

Getting the Most of Your InboxDollar$.com Account

  • February 9, 2005
  • James Skemp
A while ago, I wrote an article regarding InboxDollars.com (also known as, InboxDollar$.com). That article, On InboxDollar$.com, and similar programs, discussed some of the good things about this site and it’s program. However, I feel as though some additional information could be given. Specifically, I feel as though people are afraid to enter into these kinds of sites for a couple of reasons, which I detail, and hopefully dispel, below.

Read More

English language books by or on Arthur Schopenhauer

  • February 2, 2005
  • James Skemp

If you’re going to read more on Arthur Schopenhauer, I suggest you start with his main works, followed by other primary resources (id est, books written by him), followed by secondary resources.

Read More

Linking to documents online: the good and bad

  • February 1, 2005
  • James Skemp
Linking to documents that are found online is almost always a troublesome issue. Unlike print documents, that one could purchase online, read in the library, or read in a bookstore – for those that don’t like to purchase books – online documents are fairly fluid. This is because one major reason, as well as a few other reasons. This article will discuss that main reason, as well as whether it’s beneficial to link to documents online, and if it is, how to best do it.

Read More

Have we discovered the true goals of the United States of America?

  • January 22, 2005
  • James Skemp
First it was Afghanistan. Next, it was Iraq, Iran and North Korea, parts of the ‘axis of evil’. Now Condoleezza Rice is calling our attention to Cuba, Iran, North Korea, Zimbabwe, Burma and Belarus (Belarus? Is anyone else wondering where this is? And I keep myself fairly up to date on these things, I thought.). Gavin introduced me to Noam Chomsky’s spoken word, so I understand why Cuba would be a threat to the United States.

Read More

Stoplights: Is it better to be the first one at the light, or the last one through?

  • January 19, 2005
  • James Skemp
Something has been on my mind for a number of months as of late regarding stoplights and cars. People tend to, and perhaps naturally, speed, and my article regarding speed limits (On the Speed Limit) is fairly popular because of it. However, people also tend to not stop for yellow lights, and sometimes even for red lights, but would much rather drive through them. This raised the question of whether it really is best to be the last one through a stoplight (speed up while the light is yellow), or if it makes more sense to not ‘run’ the light, and instead be the very first one in ‘line’ at the light.

Read More

Blockbuster is ending late fees? Kind of

  • January 10, 2005
  • James Skemp
Somewhat major news is the fact that Blockbuster™, the popular video and game rental store, is ending late fees. While it’s certainly interesting news, reading up on this you’ll find that Blockbuster™ hasn’t really ended late fees, rather they have changed them in order to make more money[1]. For those of us new to late fees, these are basically fees imposed by a rental agency for not returning the rented items by the due date.

Read More

Anti-Virus Software

  • January 9, 2005
  • James Skemp
The average computer user is not an IT (Information Technology) professional. That said, the average computer user, computer users below average (especially), and many above average computer users, will end up with some kind of computer related problem at least once while using computers. There are a great number of reasons why this will occur, but for the most part it is because there are a number of programs out there that attempt to use computers for a specific purpose, while ignoring the desires of the computer’s user.

Read More

Does 'Clown Shoes' Refer to Something Other Than Shoes?

  • January 7, 2005
  • James Skemp
Listen to Does 'Clown Shoes' Refer to Something Other Than Shoes? (MP3 format) If you’re like me, and I’ll be assuming that you are during this article, then you’ve probably seen a lot more use of ‘clown shoes’ on the Internet. For whatever reason, this is not occurring simply on sites in the industry of ‘all things clown’, but is also occurring on some of the larger, and more popular, web communities.

Read More

Should Doctors Always Tell Patients the Truth?

  • December 31, 2004
  • James Skemp
Looking through an old philosophy anthology, Biomedical Ethics: Fifth Edition, I found and read On Lying to Patients, by Mack Lipkin. After reading this piece, I was again made to realize how much I dislike ethics. While Lipkin sets out to give us a theory, or method, he leaves us with more questions than answers. For this article, I would like to discuss whether doctors have an ethical obligation to tell the truth to their patients.

Read More

My Recent Experience at Best Buy

  • December 29, 2004
  • James Skemp
So I had seen the 10th Anniversary DVD Edition of Myst before the holiday rush, and was planning on making a purchase when I thought things would settle down a little bit. I also wanted to pick up a couple of copies of The Beatles, but I wasn’t sure which CDs (until I heard Norwegian Wood on the radio on the way – more about this and my interest in The Beatles in another article).

Read More

Apophysis 2.0: Free Fully Commented Scripts

  • December 16, 2004
  • James Skemp

I offer the following, fully commented, scripts for use by the Apophysis (2.0) community. Feel free to copy the following scripts into the script editor for Apophysis 2.0 or download the script files from http://strivinglife.net/. Feel free to save the scripts on your own computers, but please do not share these scripts with others; rather, direct them to this article so they can be aware of my other scripts and any enhancements I release. Comments regarding these scripts are welcomed with open arms. Thanks, and enjoy J

Read More

On the Saying 'Shitcakes'

  • December 6, 2004
  • James Skemp
The language used in this article is for mature audiences. If you might be offended, please stop reading now. The saying “Shitcakes” is in no way a popular saying[1]. In fact, it’s something of a rarity in the world today. However, since it is a saying that I have heard many a time, and since I wanted to try to understand where this statement may have originated, I decided to try to work through its significance.

Read More

On the Biblical Story of the Fall

  • November 17, 2004
  • James Skemp
I was at work, doing work, when I suddenly realized that the story of the fall really does have some importance, outside of the religions that teach it. The story of the fall is the story of Eve and Adam dining on the fruit of the tree of knowledge, or wisdom. I’d like to discuss here what I have found to be the true significance of this story. First, there are a few major items, or things, that need to be discussed in any discussion of this story.

Read More

Who is Richard Skemp?

  • November 13, 2004
  • James Skemp
Checking my referrers, I often ran across the phrase ‘Richard Skemp’ (sometimes with initial caps, often without). Since I like to be able to help people, I figured I would take a look at whom this individual is. The following is what I was able to learn from my foray into the information online. Mathematics is a necessary tool in everyday life. One of the problems, however, that I often find myself thinking about, is how you teach someone math.

Read More

On Humour at Another's Expense

  • October 25, 2004
  • James Skemp
Have you ever visited Cliff Yablonski Hates You on SomethingAwful.com? For those of you have not, maybe you'll want to take a look, maybe you won't. Google it if you'd like to see it for yourself (or just browse Something Awful), or read on. One of the easiest kinds of humour is the kind at the expense of another. Honestly, it's funny to see someone suffer some kind of hardship or accident.

Read More

Jen

  • October 21, 2004
  • James Skemp

Read More

What are the futures of those illusions Freud?

  • September 26, 2004
  • James Skemp
Notes: While primarily based upon The Future of an Illusion, Civilization and Its Discontents may have crept into this discussion. Not that this is necessarily a bad thing, seeing as how the latter is a sequel of the former, but if you have not read the latter, some of the ideas here may be new to you. Sigmund Freud tells us, near the end of the work, that “the sole purpose” of The Future of an Illusion is point out the necessity of man surmounting infantilism.

Read More

On the Saying 'God is Odd'

  • September 17, 2004
  • James Skemp
Listen to On the Saying 'God is Odd' (MP3 format). An old and popular saying states that ‘God is odd’. But is there any validity to this claim? This article shows that there is indeed validity and truth to this claim. God consists, or is equal to the addition, of three characters; ‘G’, ‘o’, and ‘d’. If a number is not evenly divisible by two, that number is odd.

Read More

Overview of Descartes' Meditations on First Philosophy

  • September 3, 2004
  • James Skemp
René Descartes’ Meditations on First Philosophy consists of three parts; a preface to the reader, a synopsis, and the six mediations themselves.  Heralded as the first ‘modern’ thinker in philosophy, Descartes introduces the problem encompassed by ‘dualism’: how is it that mind and body can interact with each other?  Descartes also questions how it is that we can know reality.  While the quick answer is through our senses, depending upon our senses opens us up to questions of how we know that our senses are correct.

Read More

On the Saying "Terrorists Will Put Bush in Office"

  • August 23, 2004
  • James Skemp
The reason most people foresee George W. Bush taking the presidency in the 2004 election is because most people believe Bush has the best chance protecting America from terrorists, compared with John Kerry.  The question is, what does this mean? Put bluntly, this means that despite Bush’s record from 2000 to the present, fear will put Bush in the Oval Office for another 4 years – fear brought on by an arbitrary colour system – fear of a people on the other side of the world, attacking us because we believe in freedom, or so they say.

Read More

On Mohandas and Arun Gandhi's Blunders of the World

  • August 16, 2004
  • James Skemp
Any indented text is my own regarding the particular blunder outlined above.  The rest of the text is Arun Gandhi’s. Mohandas K. Gandhi was convinced much of the violence in society and in our personal lives stems from the passive violence that we commit against each other. He described these acts of passive violence as the "Seven Blunders." Grandfather gave me the list in 1947 just before we left India to return to South Africa where my father, Manilal, Gandhi's second son, and my mother, Sushila, worked for nonviolent change.

Read More

Heidegger's Principle of Reason Lectures

  • June 17, 2004
  • James Skemp

The reason I picked up Martin Heidegger's The Principle of Reason was quite simple - having read Arthur Schopenhauer's The World as Will and Representation and agreed with many of his points, I attempt to further my knowledge of his principles as much as possible. While Heidegger doesn't mention Schopenhauer a single time in his thirteen Lectures, nor in his Address, Schopenhauer certainly discusses the Principle of Reason, pulling off of Leibniz, and is therefore a blatant oversight of Heidegger's to not mention Schopenhauer at all. Whether this is unintentional one cannot know from simply the text, but for a German philosopher to not know another German philosopher who covered the same content is quite surprising, to say the very least.

Having read Heidegger's work, I can't say he's moved much beyond Schopenhauer. If this is what progress has given us since Schopenhauer's time, I can't say I'm too impressed with the progression. Nonetheless, Heidegger deserves to be mentioned, which is what I shall attempt to do here, in as few words as possible.

Read More

On Rest

  • June 13, 2004
  • James Skemp
Rest. Passivity. Inactivity. All speak of the absence of movement – the absence of activity – in common language. Yet, when I stand still is it really very different than when I am moving about? Is inactivity really the absence of activity? Let us say I am walking down the street. I see a beautiful manikin in a storefront window with short, shoulder length, red hair. While it is true that I am no longer in motion – I no longer advance down the street, I still made a choice to stop at the particular storefront window and look in.

Read More

On Karate

  • May 6, 2004
  • James Skemp
Listen to On Karate (MP3 format). The best thing about Karate is that you can be walking down the street with someone and they can bust a Karate Move™ just like that. Karate, pronounced care-aht-tay, is more than just a way of life; it’s also a way of being and living. On a scale from one to ten, it’s ten times God. One time I was walking down the street with my friend and he was like ‘Woah!

Read More

On the Difference Between Business and Personal Sites on the Internet

  • March 31, 2004
  • James Skemp
The Internet consists of a couple different kinds of sites. In the first place, we have educational sites, such as universities, libraries, and working groups. We also have business sites, which include sites that sell products online, as well as those that offer technical support through their site. Personal sites, another category, take up another chunk of the Internet. Personal sites can vary between a journal of an individual, to a compilation of multiple individuals (either in design or content).

Read More

An Open Letter to Richard Fitz

  • March 6, 2004
  • James Skemp
January 11 2005: I noticed a missing parenthesis, so I made the change – this is such a minor change that it has no real impact upon the document as a whole. <Address Information Removed> Mr. Fitz, On March 3rd 2004 I found, much to my dismay, an individual attributing various unsatisfactory statements to you, Richard Fitz. I, having read contrary statements in articles that you had previously written, felt that the very least I could was point out said statements to this individual, as well as suggest to them that they contact you directly regarding said statements.

Read More

Heilbroner's Inquiry Into the Human Prospect

  • February 6, 2004
  • James Skemp
I must admit that Robert Heilbroner's An Inquiry Into the Human Prospect was not quite the book that I thought it was going to be. The title and cover were what drew me to the book, and the back cover information had little impact, if any, because I realized after reading the book that I may not have read it... Of course, Heilbroner refers to Hobbes at least once, and Marx quite a few times, and since these two are political philosophers, and since philosophy runs through everything, I wasn't displeased with the book in the least.

Read More

On the Speed Limit

  • February 4, 2004
  • James Skemp

Let's assume, firstly, that you are driving in a 55 mile per hour (mph) zone. Now, that is the speed limit, or, in other words, the limitation of traffic/vehicle speed. Now, if you are going 55 mph, then you are going 100% of the allocated speed. That is, you are going 55 in a 55 zone.

Now, if you are going 50 mph, in that same 55 mph zone, then you are going 90.90% of the allocated speed (50 / 55). So, you are going ~ 9.1% under the speed limit (5 / 55). Now, if you are going 5 mph over the speed limit, or 60 mph, then you are going ~ 9.1% over the speed limit, or, 109% of the allocated speed limit (60 / 55). Now, 109% over the posted speed limit is not that bad.

Now, let us assume that you are going 65 mph in a 55 mph zone. 65 / 55 is equal to 1.18, so, you are going 118% over the speed limit. Now, what about 7 mph over the speed limit (in a 55 mph zone)? Well, 62 mph translates to ~ 113% of the speed limit, or 13% over the speed limit.

Now, let us take that 7 mph and translate it to a few different speeds, which tend to be common road speeds (at least in Wisconsin), as well as what 5 mph over the speed limit would be, as well as 10 mph over. All percentages are rounded to the nearest percent (1%) in this and in later tables.

Zone Speed Limit
in mph
(ZSL)

Read More

Acronyms

  • February 3, 2004
  • James Skemp

Read More

A Brief Discussion Amongst 19th Century Thinkers

  • December 14, 2003
  • James Skemp
Dear Sirs: I thank you for your interest in my system, as well as for your interesting comments. I do not think, however, that you clearly understood my main points about the goals, or end, of life. Please find here my thoughts regarding this. I look forward to your comments regarding this. As I said before, everything leads towards one goal, which 'results' in the end of history.

Read More

Thoughts and comments on Waking Life: The Holy Moment

  • December 11, 2003
  • James Skemp
Primarily Written/Added: May 14th 2003 Edited/Updated: September 18th 2003; November 10th 2003; December 11th 2003 This article is based upon Chapter 11 of Waking Life. See the complete script for Waking Life. There is more to this then the discussion about God. This is packed full with a lot of various things, all of which deserve some time. I'll start with this passage first. However, before I do that, I should point out that I'm not sure whether or not these two are both film directors.

Read More

Overview of B.F. Skinner's Beyond Freedom & Dignity: Chapter 6

  • December 9, 2003
  • James Skemp
Note: Mainly, I will be quoting Skinner, interceding my own comments if/when necessary. This should not be taken as something which explains this particular chapter, rather as something which points out some of the things that I found to be important (and that I made notes regarding in the margins). Notes regarding mistyped statements would be greatly appreciated (since I had to type all of these quotes myself). Originally titled: B.

Read More

On the Saying "A Penny Saved is a Penny Earned"

  • December 1, 2003
  • James Skemp
It's said that "a penny saved is a penny earned," but is that really true? How can it be that by saving something you earn it? Doesn't the fact that you already have, in this case, a penny prohibit you from earning it, since we usually give something to someone and say they earned it...? After some thought regarding this topic I have come to find a possible answer to the question of what this saying means.

Read More

History and Analysis of Thebes, Greece

  • December 1, 2003
  • James Skemp

Read More

Michael Dawson's Tri-Level Hypothesis and Cognitive Science

  • November 30, 2003
  • James Skemp
Michael Dawson, in his book Understanding Cognitive Science attempts to provide a basic understanding of cognitive science, specifically by dealing with and using the "tri-level" hypothesis. For this paper, I will be discussing the tri-level hypothesis and what it tells us about cognitive science. One of the major problems in any science is the problem of discussing the findings within a set field with people outside of the field.

Read More

On the Saying 'Change is Good'

  • November 24, 2003
  • James Skemp
I recently, while daydreaming yet again in a class, happened upon the phrase residing on the side of a McDonald's cup stating that "Change is Good". I, of course, am quite familiar with this saying, however, I was a tad confused. Because of this confusion, I decided that it would be best for me to go ahead and examine the saying "Change is Good" in order to see just what was meant by this saying.

Read More

Written on a piece of paper: November 17 2003

  • November 17, 2003
  • James Skemp
January 2, 2009: The following was written on a piece of paper I recently found (again), dated Nov 17th 2003. Might as well type them up and trash the paper … 'U.S.' versus 'Them' While most people believe that the popular saying "us versus them" means, or says, that it's you with anyone else versus those contrary to you in some regard - the 'thems.' However, it is not so much that is you and your group versus 'them' as it is the United States versus 'them' - namely those that are not the allies of the United States, but sometimes even the allies of the United States.

Read More

Beyond the Biological Imperative

  • October 30, 2003
  • James Skemp

Quite a few years ago I took a lower level Introduction to Biology course in college. While I did pretty bad in the course, I did learn quite a few things. One of the things that I learned was about the 'Biological Imperative'. The 'Biological Imperative', as I now understand it - whether or not it was taught like this - is that all biological beings are born/created (not in the 'Creation' sense, but rather as a way to express plants, which are not born, per se, and some animals, which are hatched, and are not, per se, born) with certain desires/strivings. These strivings are applicable to any, and all, biological entities. For this article, I'd like to discuss the Biological Imperative in various ways. First, I'd like to describe what I believe the Biological Imperative is, at it's fundamental root - at a level basic, and truly applicable, to any and all biological entities. Then, I'd like to mention how culture appears to fit into all of this, bringing in Philosophy when possible and applicable.

Please note that this is a work in progress. Realistically, someone could write a book on this subject (and I was quite surprised that 'Beyond the Biological Imperative' received no results, per se, on Google when I did a search - October 30th 2003) since the subject is so encompassing. So, therefore, I'll be working on sections at a time, not completing the work as a whole, but rather completing parts of the whole. For this reason, I look forward to any comments regarding this material, as they may help guide this article's direction.

Read More

On Arnold Schwarzenegger Having Become Governor of California

  • October 13, 2003
  • James Skemp

Unless you've been lying in a coma, or spending an extraordinary amount of time playing such games as Sid Meier's SIMGolf™, SimCity 3000™ Unlimited, Age of Empires II, Solitaire, etcetera, or, if you're just reading this (perhaps) long after I've written it, you probably heard that Arnold Schwarzenegger (see Running Man, Terminator, Terminator 2, Terminator 3, Kindergarten Cop, Total Recall, etcetera) has become, according to the masses of Californians that went out to vote, the next Governor of California, taking the place of the recalled (the second in the nation) Governor, Gray Davis (I personally keep thinking it should be Gary, but... interesting name I suppose). There's a lot going on with this, Arnold becoming the next Governor, and I've put off writing this page for that reason, as well as for a few other reasons... Anyways, even though I live in Wisconsin, I figured I'd tackle a few of the things that I've thought whilst paying attention to this. Here goes :)

1) Schwarzenegger the Running Man: From the Beautiful Lips of Sandra Bullock

Read More

Using Disk Investigator to Regain Files

  • October 9, 2003
  • James Skemp
I've already discussed Disk Investigator in some detail (see Overview of Disk Investigator). However, what I really want to have is an example of the great use Disk Investigator is. In order to do this, I'm going to set up an example - an example of a situation that is not too uncommon - in order to show just how powerful it is. I urge you to follow along, with my example, on your own computer.

Read More

Hegel and Plato's Principle of Activation: The Dialectic

  • September 29, 2003
  • James Skemp
According to Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel, the dialectic "is in general the principle of all motion, of all life, and of all activation in the actual world", as well as "the soul of all genuinely scientific cognition." [1: 171] In other words, Hegel believes that the dialectic is the soul - the spirit one may say - of scientific cognition, or thought, as per the second quote. Because of this, if one wants to perform science, if one wants to study, and understand, the world around oneself, the dialectic must be used, and understood.

Read More

A Response to Marilyn Adamson's Article Titled 'Is There A God?'

  • August 27, 2003
  • James Skemp
"Just once wouldn't you love for someone to simply show you the evidence for God's existence? No armtwisting. No statements of, "You just have to believe." Well, here is an attempt to candidly offer some of the reasons which suggest that God exists." [1] Sounds like an interesting, and bold, statement. After all, people have been attempting to prove God's existence by use of reason almost as long, and as much, as they have been using force to.

Read More

12 Monkeys: A Timeline of the Events of the Movie

  • June 28, 2003
  • James Skemp
Notes: See also my paper titled Pulp Fiction: A Timeline of the Events of the Movie. I brought you the timeline for Pulp Fiction (see my paper titled Pulp Fiction: A Timeline of the Events of the Movie), now I bring you the timeline for the movie 12 Monkeys, another interesting, and time-wise 'weird', movie. As I see it, it's something like this. Well, first, note that this is the timeline in terms of real time, not in terms of movie time.

Read More

On the Saying 'Idle Hands are the Devil's Tools'

  • June 2, 2003
  • James Skemp

It is said that "Idle Hands Are The Devil's Tools", meaning that when one is bored, one tends to get into trouble. I have a problem, or concern, with this statement however. Let's say I'm bored and I end up setting fire to a kerosene soaked blanket which ends up leading to my home becoming engulfed in flames. Now, if we want to get technical, which is exactly what I want to do, then as soon as my hands are no longer idle - as soon as I begin to do something with my hands - they are not the devil's tools, right?

To put it into logical terms, "Idle hands are the devil's tools" seems to be something like: I ≡ D, where I is 'Idle Hands' and D is 'the Devil's Tools', meaning that 'Idle Hands' are 'the Devil's Tools'.

Read More

Horrific Hair

  • May 20, 2003
  • James Skemp

So, you're chewing on something, who knows exactly what (well, you know what - use your imagination) when you come to the realization that there is a hair in your mouth. You may not have any idea where it came from, whether it is a hair off of the top of your head, that fell onto your food, or what, but you know that it's in your mouth now. It's a fairly long hair, an inch and a half to two inches long probably. Anyways, one way or another, the hair is now in your mouth. Yet, for some reason, you decide not to take it out of your mouth. Instead, you decide that you don't really want to put your fingers in your mouth, for whatever reason. So, you munch on your food and end up swallowing your food. Yet, for some reason, the hair gets stuck in your throat. You attempt to clear your throat - once, twice - yet ... nothing really happens, other then the hairs focus in your mind. That is, you realize, more and more, that the hair does not seem to be moveable. You clear your throat again and feel a pain, like getting a paper cut. Know what that feels like, when you finally realize that you have a paper cut? It's ... well, let's imagine what that feels like now ...

That's the kind of feeling you get, as you clear your throat. You come to the realization that you have just moved the hair, but perhaps not in the way you were hoping. Instead of moving it out of your throat you have moved it into your throat. That is, the hair has now sliced through a slight layer of skin, within your throat. Perhaps your nerve endings are going off, one after another, in rows, all the way from your stomach to the top of your head. The shivers - a ghostly touch - a dance on a grave ...

Read More

On the Saying "The Customer is Always Right"

  • May 19, 2003
  • James Skemp
One of the most heard sayings in the customer service business is "the customer is always right". The common meaning of this statement is that no matter what the customer says, they are to be treated as though they are correct. Let us take an example. Customer orders a burger with no ketchup and with no cheese. They ask for it to be this way. Then, after getting their burger, they come up to the counter and say that they didn't get the cheese on the burger, even though they asked for it.

Read More

Religion and Medieval Philosophy: Final Text Analysis

  • May 14, 2003
  • James Skemp
Another version of this, slightly updated it seems, is also available, titled Thomas Aquinas’ Summa Theologica and the Question of the Will. Whenever I think about Medieval Philosophy, from this point on after taking this class, I will also think about religion. When I think about religion I think about God and free will. So, since I need to have a topic for this final analysis, I decided that I should probably take one of these topics, and find some writer who would be the best to analysis in this area.

Read More

Thomas Aquinas' Summa Theologica and the Question of the Will

  • May 13, 2003
  • James Skemp
Whenever I think about Medieval Philosophy, from this point on after taking this class, I will also think about religion. When I think about religion I think about God and free will. So, since I need to have a topic for this final analysis, I decided that I should probably take one of these topics, and find some writer who would be the best to analysis in this area. After looking at the articles, I decided that I would take Thomas Aquinas’ Summa Theologica and look at how he answers the question of what the will is, and whether it acts of its own accord.

Read More

The Analytic and Phenomenological Traditions in Relation to Intentionality

  • May 11, 2003
  • James Skemp
This semester, we looked at Michael Corrado’s Analytic Tradition in Philosophy: Background and Issues, Tim Crane’s Elements of Mind: An Introduction to the Philosophy of Mind, and The Cambridge Companion to Husserl. Through these writings we have learned more about the Theory of Intentionality, from two different perspectives, the Analytic Philosophy tradition – as shown by Corrado and Crane – and the Phenomenological tradition – as showcased by Husserl, or, more perhaps more appropriately, the individuals writing on Husserl.

Read More

Religion and Medieval Philosophy: Final Take Home Exam

  • May 7, 2003
  • James Skemp
1. Present Algazali’s argument for the incoherence of the philosophers and Averroe’s response to it. Also present your own critique. Algazali, in The Incoherence of the Philosophers, argues that “what is customarily believed to be cause and what is believed to be an effect is not necessary, according to our opinion; but each of the two [namely, cause and effect] is independent of the other.” [1: 283] In other words, while philosophers believe that there exists such a law that if x occurs then y occurs – that there is a system of cause and effect – Algazali believes that there is no relationship between cause and effect.

Read More

Experience as the Central Value of the Age of Reason

  • May 5, 2003
  • James Skemp
Francis Bacon's New Atlantis was the first chosen source to read for this Age of Reason class. Bacon's work best fits as a beginning reading for various reasons, one of which is the applicability of the book as showcasing the major ideas of the Age of Reason at the beginning of their formation, in many cases. For this paper, I will begin by examining Bacon's New Atlantis, in a specific area, and then pursuing that area's progress, or reiteration, in some of the other readings from this age.

Read More

Epistemology: Paper on Husserl and Logical Investigations

  • April 27, 2003
  • James Skemp
In this paper, I will be trying to discuss Edmund Husserl’s theory of impossible objects and meanings in the Logical Investigations.  His theories of experience, knowledge, truth, and fact, will also be discussed in an attempt to determine their relation to these impossible things.  By looking at the Logical Investigations Investigation by Investigation, I hope to see where he speaks of his ideas of experience, knowledge, truth and fact.  After looking at these ideas, I should be able to end by speaking of impossible things.

Read More

The Importance of One

  • April 21, 2003
  • James Skemp
We often hear of the importance of one. This will briefly look at the numbers of just how important one is. After that, I’d like to discuss this issue (knowing full well that I will end up going off on a tangent). The importance of one person when there are x people: x people % that one person equals (1/x)*100 1 100 2 50 3 33.

Read More

On the Saying "If God exists, let him strike me down where I stand"

  • April 13, 2003
  • James Skemp
Often times we will hear one say to another that they do not believe in God. They will then say, as a way to prove to the other that they are right, that God does not exist, that if God exists then God would have the power to strike him down, as he is a non-believer. Of course, this cannot happen for various reasons, which I will attempt to discuss below.

Read More

Crane's Intentionality of the Mental in Relation to Perception and Thought

  • March 30, 2003
  • James Skemp
In Tim Crane’s book, Elements of Mind: An Introduction to the Philosophy of Mind, we are given a contemporary look at the Analytic Tradition, and their use of the ideas of Intentionality to come to the truth about perception and thought.  Crane attempts to explain to the reader how perception and thought are related, as well as the role of intentionality in relation to perception and thought. For the most part, when we speak of the terms ‘perception’ and ‘thought’ we can rely almost solely upon a particular individual.

Read More

Religion and Medieval Philosophy: Mid Term Take Home Exam/Essays

  • March 24, 2003
  • James Skemp
1. According to Augustine, God is not responsible for the existence of evil. What is his argument? Present the argument in detail. In On Free Will, Augustine speaks of man’s freedom to will, or make decisions, for himself. He also speaks of evil, and how a man can do evil, as well as where evil comes from. Now, Augustine believes that man is inclined to do Good, which is to follow God and seek out happiness, through virtuous activity, and not through the goods of this physical world.

Read More

Religion and Medieval Philosophy: Textual Analysis Paper 1

  • March 13, 2003
  • James Skemp
The following is a paper written for a Religion and Medieval Philosophy course. Every time I heard someone speak of scholasticism I never quite knew what they meant. Having heard of it in many classes in the philosophy of religion ‘genera’, I was convinced that it was something that refers to philosophers who dealt with the philosophy of religion, and specifically in the time period of the medieval era – especially around the years of St Thomas Aquinas and St Augustine.

Read More

Religion and Medieval Philosophy: Text Analysis 2

  • February 23, 2003
  • James Skemp
This paper was written for a Religion and Medieval Philosophy course. The material of this text analysis will be Peter Abailard and his work The Glosses of Peter Abailard on Porphyry. As Abailard tells us, “There are then three questions, as Boethius says, secret and very useful and tried by not a few philosophers, but solved by few. The first is as follows, namely, whether genera and species subsist or are placed in the naked understandings alone, etc.

Read More

The Problems of Perception and Thought as Discussed by Michael Corrado

  • February 16, 2003
  • James Skemp
In Michael Corrado’s Analytic Tradition in Philosophy: Background and Issues, we are introduced to the analytical tradition in a way that has not been attempted since the time of this book. Instead of bundling philosophical works into an anthology Corrado attempts to explain what the fundamental characteristics are that tie these thinkers together. For this paper, I focus solely on the problems of perception and thought in the earlier analytic tradition, as Corrado discusses in this work, particularly on the first part, in which he discusses the background of the tradition – and therefore the earlier tradition.

Read More

Religion and Medieval Philosophy: Text Analysis 1

  • February 10, 2003
  • James Skemp
The following was written for a Religion and Medieval Philosophy course. In Augustine’s The City of God, Augustine discusses what he thinks the City of God would be like. While there is no one particular page or passage that especially stuck out for me, I’m going focus on what Augustine says about other gods/religions and how that compares to what many people think in today’s society. For this analysis, I would like to show some of the reasons that I think this.

Read More

Does AOL.com offer anything of value to someone not on AOL?

  • January 19, 2003
  • James Skemp
First of all, I would like to share a screen capture from one of my visits to AOL.com on December 8th, 2002. Screen capture from 2002.12.08 Basically, and I’m afraid it’s not as clear as one would like, I visited http://www.aol.com/ and received this message. After reading the message, I pulled up the information on my browser (Help -> About Internet Explorer) and took a snapshot (using XnView). Imagine my surprise - well, not really - when I found that the browser I was using was the browser that they wanted me to use, if I wasn't going to use their browser of course.

Read More

Philosophy, Politics, and Law Final Regarding Justice and Various Philosophers

  • December 18, 2002
  • James Skemp
For over 2500 years, philosophers have debated on such issues as rights, reality, freedom, and justice. In all of those years, one decision on what is meant by these terms has never been set in stone; a final definition - or answer - has never been reached. Therefore, when someone asks the philosopher, or even one who has merely studied philosophy, what justice is, or what any of the other terms mean exactly, there is typically not one answer that is prevalent to all.

Read More

Husserl's Phenomenological Epoché and Theory of Intentionality

  • December 16, 2002
  • James Skemp
Edmund Husserl, in his Ideas Pertaining to a Pure Phenomenology and to a Phenomenological Philosophy, begins by discussing natural cognition and experience. Husserl explores experience, believing that experience is how we view the world around us. However, it is not enough to know that experience gives us insight. According to Husserl, we must, primarily, know how we are conscious of the world around us, before we can talk about the actuality of what we see.

Read More

The Increase of the Power of Man and Science as the Main Theme of the Nineteenth Century

  • December 15, 2002
  • James Skemp
The nineteenth century could be described as containing three major movements; Romanticism, Realism, and Modernism. Each movement has its own important features and major themes that have had an effect on the present day world. If I had to state one of the major themes of the entire nineteenth century, it would be the increase of the power of man and science. The beginning of the nineteenth century saw writers such as Mary Shelley, with her work Frankenstein.

Read More

Science and Human Values Final: What makes an experiment ethical?

  • December 8, 2002
  • James Skemp
Part I The question of what it is that makes one particular experiment ethical while another is unethical is a troublesome question. Is the ethicalness of a scientific experiment based upon whether the subject is harmed, whether the subject's rights have been in some way infringed upon, or is it based upon some other criteria? In this paper, I will take the position that it is not whether the subject was harmed, or whether their rights were infringed upon, but rather that it is ultimately power that determines the ethicalness of an experiment (position IV).

Read More

Can Man and Society Exist Without Religion?

  • November 27, 2002
  • James Skemp
One of the most prevalent themes in the readings for this class has been religion, or mysticism, and its influence on and necessity for both man and society. The question that keeps arising is, however, can man and society live do without religion, or something similar? The modern man has more trust, for the most part, in science then he has in religion. However, what does this mean? First, I would like to take a look at what religion has done for man, in relation to the readings in general.

Read More

Philosophy, Politics, and Law Final Prospectus

  • November 27, 2002
  • James Skemp
See also my paper tiled: Philosophy, Politics, and Law Final Regarding Justice and Various Philosophers. For my paper, I was going to attempt to answer what justice is. Obviously, Plato's Republic will be of use for this topic. Particularly his discussion with others, as well as how he thinks the state should be setup. I'm not going to put any of Machiavelli's The Prince in my paper, because I wasn't too much of a fan of him, and he doesn't really go into what justice 'really' is.

Read More

The Three Kinds of Inference

  • November 12, 2002
  • James Skemp

Recently, while listening to a philosophical discussion, I came to hear that there were not two kinds of inference (deductive and inductive), as I thought before, but instead that there were three kinds; deductive, inductive, and abductive. Wanting to know more about abductive reasoning, I did a little search, finding the following information.

First, let's show deduction, by way of an example:

Read More

Downloading Stuff From Other People Using WinMX

  • November 11, 2002
  • James Skemp

This is meant to help people understand the various things that you see when you download something off of someone else. If you have any questions, ask :)

Note: I no longer support WinMX. I merely post this in the hope that it's still of some benefit. Remember, P2P sharing is not, in itself, wrong - it's all about how you use it. Be responsible.

Thumbnails will open up images captured on my screen (1024x768) with irrelevant stuff cut out.

Read More

Dostoevsky's Underground Man as the Creation of Society

  • October 31, 2002
  • James Skemp
In his Notes from Underground, Fyodor Dostoevsky asks what it is that civilization, or society in general, gives to the individual. In essence, the question concerns where the individual resides in society; what can be learned from man's place in a society? Dostoevsky presents to the reader a conflicted, sickly individual, and explores why the individual is the way he is, as well as whether society could do anything to help him from his lowly state.

Read More

Rules for Sentential Logic

  • October 29, 2002
  • James Skemp

Read More

Searching for a Friend: The Quest for a Definition of 'Friend' -or- What is a Friend? -or- Relationships with Others

  • October 29, 2002
  • James Skemp

The Problem

What exactly is it that makes an individual a ‘friend’? Why is one person a ‘friend’, another not, and yet another your ‘best friend’?

According to Dictionary.com, a friend is;

Read More

The Four Dimensions: A Brief Introduction

  • October 23, 2002
  • James Skemp
Primarily Written/Added: October 23rd 2002 Edited/Updated: November 21st 2002; October 30th 2003; January 19th 2004 See also: Fourth Dimension: Tetraspace (the most comprehensive site on the four dimensions I've seen on the web) Note: Having a basic high school level of education would probably help in understanding this page, however it is not completely necessary. If you want a greatly in-depth look at this information, I suggest you visit the site above (Fourth Dimension: Tetraspace) since it is updated on a much more regular basis then this page :)

Read More

Antony Flew and The Falsification Debate

  • October 2, 2002
  • James Skemp
In this paper, I will be discussing the points that Antony Flew contributes to the debate on whether religious claims must be proven by empirical means in order to be factually meaningful. First, I will discuss Flew’s major contribution, which is the analogy of the gardener. Second, I will discuss why this analogy helps to show that religious claims make no assertions, and are instead mere utterances. Flew begins his piece with a parable.

Read More

Guide to One Philosophy of Life: Revision 1

  • September 29, 2002
  • James Skemp
The following was written from January 30, 2002 to September 29, 2002, but I am just now (January 30, 2009) getting around to posting this. I can honestly admit that I haven't read over this in a very long time, but the skimming that I have done reminds me of certain things ... As time progresses I may go back and re-purpose this content. (Of particular note, also, will be at what time these were written and when I was reading certain philosophical works.

Read More

Man's Quest for Dominance over Nature within Frankenstein

  • September 18, 2002
  • James Skemp
During the period of Romanticism, art and literature was attempting to get back to, and raise interest in, the natural. With more people in cities, as well as the effects of Industrialization, many were feeling that man was moving too fast. For this paper, I am going to talk about man's quest for dominance over nature, with particular interest in Mary Shelley's Frankenstein. Throughout history, man has been trying to become a controller of nature.

Read More

Descartes, Meditations and the Problem of the Dualism

  • May 6, 2002
  • James Skemp
Descartes’ rationalist notion of necessary and contingent connections between simple natures has an important role in his Meditations. This, in turn, has an impact on other philosophers to come, in relation to the problems that the Meditations raise. This paper will first deal with simple natures, their connections, and their role in Descartes’ Meditations. After looking at Descartes, three other philosophers will be looked at to see how they deal with the ideas brought up by Descartes.

Read More

The Impact of Civilization and Its Laws on the Individual

  • May 3, 2002
  • James Skemp
What is the impact that civilization and its laws have on the individual? Particularly in the case of values and morality, does civilization help define one's values, or does it subvert them, leaving behind only those values that it can use in order to survive and converting those it can not? For this paper, I would like to look at Fyodor Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment and show how Sigmund Freud's Civilization and Its Discontents is related to this story.

Read More

Confucian View on Conflict and the Ruler

  • April 22, 2002
  • James Skemp
For this paper, I would like to focus on the topic of conflict and the ruler from the view of Confucianism. Specifically, I would like to look on how a ruler should operate, and under what conditions conflict, or war, should occur. By looking at the Analects, the Book of Mencius, the Doctrine of the Mean, and the Great Learning, I hope to gain some insight into the relationship between these two subjects.

Read More

Applied Theoretical Ethics Term Paper

  • April 21, 2002
  • James Skemp
“Let us suppose that organ transplant procedures have been perfected; in such circumstances if two dying patients could be saved by organ transplants then, if surgeon have the requisite organs in stock and no other needy patients, but nevertheless allow their patients to die, we would be inclined to say, and be justified in saying, that the patients died because the doctors refused to save them. But if there are no spare organs in stock and none otherwise available, the doctors have no choice, they cannot save their patients and so must let them die.

Read More

The Great Learning of the Confucian School

  • March 30, 2002
  • James Skemp
From the introductory material, we learn that the Great Learning "gives the Confucian educational, moral, and political programs in a nutshell" (1: 84). These ideas are summed up as, and consist of; manifesting the clear character of man, loving the people, and abiding in the highest good. There are also eight steps that should be followed; "the investigation of things, extension of knowledge, sincerity of the will, rectification of the mind, cultivation of the personal life, regulation of the family, national order, and world peace" (1: 84).

Read More

Ancient Philosophy: Aristotle and Nichomachean Ethics

  • December 20, 2001
  • James Skemp
This semester we have looked at many different philosophers from the pre-Socratic up to Aristotle. For this paper, I will be talking about Aristotle’s Nichomachean Ethics and my view of what Aristotle states in this work. Specifically, I will be focusing on his view of happiness and comparing it with my view on happiness. Aristotle first begins Nichomachean Ethics by giving a definition of the good. “The good, therefore, has been well defined as that at which all things aim.

Read More

Perspectives on Human Values: The Renaissance: Final Paper: Montaigne

  • December 12, 2001
  • James Skemp
So far this semester, we have looked at four different writers of the Renaissance period. Of all of them, I personally found Montaigne to be the most interesting and appealing author. For this final paper, I will be discussing Montaigne’s use of the self and the main points of the pieces that we read, followed by what I think about Montaigne’s writing. The first piece that we read by Montaigne was Essay 14 in Book I: “That the taste of good and evil things depends in large part on the opinion we have of them”.

Read More

Chapter Synopsis - Chapter XIX, John Locke

  • November 3, 2001
  • James Skemp
For my chapter synopsis, I read Chapter XIX. Of the Dissolution of Government for John Locke. This chapter deals with dissolving the government; how governments are dissolved, and what do to when they are. He says that governments are either overturned from without, or from within. When a foreign force conquests the commonwealth, the current government can not survive. Therefore, we return to the state of nature, and are free to survive alone, or find another way to survive, with another government.

Read More

Ancient Philosophy: The Importance of Socrates

  • October 30, 2001
  • James Skemp
The following paper was written for an Ancient Philosophy course that I took in college. I have not reviewed it since. Although none of Socrates actual writings exist, what we can get from Plato about Socrates shows the importance that Socrates played in not only the past, but also the influence that he has today. In this paper, I will be discussing the main reasons that Socrates had such an influence on philosophy.

Read More

Ancient Philosophy: The Importance of Socrates (First draft)

  • October 25, 2001
  • James Skemp
This was the first attempt at The Importance of Socrates. Although none of Socrates actual writings exist, what we can get from Plato on Socrates shows the importance that Socrates played not only in the past, but also the influence that he has today. From Plato, we are able to learn some of the reasons that Socrates is important. In this paper, I’ll be discussing the main reasons that Socrates was persecuted, in the hopes that this will shed some light on why he was so important.

Read More

Erasmus' Understanding of Authority

  • October 10, 2001
  • James Skemp
This paper was written for the class Perspectives of Human Values: The Renaissance for the mid-term paper. This paper will explore Erasmus’ understanding of authority.  First of all, Erasmus’ view on the Bible and Scripture will be discussed.  Secondly, what he has to say about the Spirit will be discussed.  Lastly, Erasmus’ view on church will be discussed.  Since Erasmus’ primary focus in his paper was on the Bible, that too will be the focus of this paper.

Read More

One Page Response Paper - Erasmus, "On the Freedom of The Will"

  • September 19, 2001
  • James Skemp
This paper was written for the class Perspectives on Human Values: The Renaissance.  For this short response paper, we’re asked to summarize “On the Freedom of The Will” by Erasmus. To sum it up very shortly, free will. Throughout the book, Erasmus is trying to show us that the Bible is filled with examples that strength the idea that an individual has free will, or the choice to do as they want, whether it be good or evil.

Read More

The Foundations of Western Culture and Nationalism

  • May 13, 2001
  • James Skemp
“O my brothers, love your Country! Our country is our Home, the house that God has given us…” (Mazzini). It’s not hard to see why nationalism doesn’t sound like a good idea. Nationalism is the idea that the nation that you live in is important, and that when you look at yourself, you should see your nation, and its ideals. Nationalism has been around for a very long time, probably as long as there have been nations.

Read More

Introduction to Literature - Paper Number One

  • March 8, 2001
  • James Skemp
For this paper, I went to go see The Glass Menagerie by Tennessee Williams. This play was put on at the Weidner Center, and was the first student production that I had seen there. In fact, this was the first time that I had heard of both the story and the author. Overall, I really enjoyed The Glass Menagerie. I thought that the acting was good and I really enjoyed the story.

Read More

Rousseau's Social Contract and the Foundation of Western Culture

  • March 7, 2001
  • James Skemp
“Man is born free; and everywhere he is in chains.” (Rousseau, Chapter I). Jean-Jacques Rousseau and The Social Contract had a large impact on Western Civilization in the late 18th century. Rousseau based his ideas on some of the writings of previous philosophers, trying to form a good political theory. The Social Contract was developed by Jean-Jacques Rousseau around 1762, during the time of the scientific revolution and the Enlightenment. The Social Contract was based on the ideas of Baron de Montesquieu and John Locke.

Read More

Report to the Gerousia: A Spartan's View of Athens and It's People

  • April 9, 2000
  • James Skemp
My wise Gerousia, You have told me to visit Athens and gather information on the Athenians. I have done so and am writing this report to try to describe to you Athenian society. I have many things to tell you about; their culture and politics, the personalities of the Athenians, Athenian “democracy”, and I want to tell you about Pericles and his “Funeral Oration”. Upon my arrival, one of the first things I noticed was the size of Athens.

Read More

Psychology and Life Paper - Into the Next Millennium

  • December 20, 1999
  • James Skemp
In May 1998, at Thurston High School in Springfield, Oregon, Kip Kinkel opened fire on his fellow students and his own parents. In April 1999, at Columbine High School in Littleton, Colorado, two students opened fire on teachers and students, and then killed themselves. What caused these students to kill other students? What attracts humans to violence, and what causes some people to push aside their moral values to actually be able to commit such violent acts?

Read More

Gene Involvement in Corn Seedlings

  • November 16, 1999
  • James Skemp
Objective In the 1860s, Gregor Mendel followed the pattern of inheritance in plants, hoping to understand the transmission of characteristics by heredity. A few important terms in inheritance are; Segregation: Inherited pairs of genes for traits segregate/separate into separate gametes. Phenotype: In these experiments, the observable trait of a plant. Whether it is tall or short, or green or white. Genotype: The genetic makeup of the plants. Whether it is GG, Gg, or gg, in this experiment.

Read More

Enzyme Activity and Temperature

  • October 12, 1999
  • James Skemp
I. Objective For my lab report, I will be discussing the effect of temperature on enzyme activity. Enzymes help a chemical reaction occur faster. The ability of an enzyme to speed up a reaction depends on the environmental conditions. My hypothesis is that if the environment is very cold the enzyme will not be able to function very well. The reason that I say this, is because at cold temperatures, reactions tend to slow down.

Read More

Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

  • March 18, 1999
  • James Skemp
Introduction Obsessive-compulsive disorder, or OCD, is defined as having continued thoughts about performing a certain act over and over (McMahon 643). For people living with obsessive-compulsive disorder, it can be very scary to not have control over what you are thinking, and sometimes, even doing. For example, one woman would spend thirteen hours a day washing her hands and her house and if she accidentally touched something else while cleaning, it could set her off and make her spend even more time cleaning (Friedland 70).

Read More

All content copyright 1999-2016 James Skemp, unless otherwise noted. This work is licensed under the Creative Commons License Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0. The opinions expressed herein are my own personal opinions and do not represent my employer's view in anyway. Privacy Policy. For more information, contact the administrator at strivinglife [at] gmail [dot] com.

Generated using Hugo and the Phlat Theme.